Browse Lots

COVID-19 Important notice Read More
AN EXTREMELY RARE PAIR OF AMERICAN SILVER CANDLESTICKS
ANOTHER PROPERTY
AN EXTREMELY RARE PAIR OF AMERICAN SILVER CANDLESTICKS

ATTRIBUTED TO MYER MYERS, NEW YORK, 1755-1760; THE SOCKETS CANDLESTICKS WITH MAKER'SARKAT OF OTTO PAUL DE PARISIEN, ONE NOZZLE MAKER'S MARK OF MYER MYERS

Details
AN EXTREMELY RARE PAIR OF AMERICAN SILVER CANDLESTICKS Attributed to Myer Myers, New York, 1755-1760; the sockets candlesticks with maker'sarkat of Otto Paul de Parisien, one nozzle maker's mark of Myer Myers Each on spreading hexagonal base with shells at intervals, rising to a knopped baluster stem with conforming decoration, the cylindrical socket with molded mid-band, the hexafoil nozzles (one later) with shells at intervals, marked on both sockets ?PDP indistinct, and on one nozzle MM conjoined; both candlesticks and the Myers nozzle marked with French control marks for 1864-93 10¼in. high; 39oz. 10dwt. (2)

Lot Essay


David Barquist, in his recent book, Myer Myers: Jewish Silversmith in Colonial New York, has established that silversmith Parisien was closely associated with Myer Myers from the mid-1750s to the mid-1760s, and that silver objects bearing his mark were actually likely made by Myers. Dr. Barquist believes that Parisien worked primarily as a "specialty outworker" (i.e. chaser) or jeweler, and that the large objects in silver marked and sold by Parisien were in fact made and supplied by Myers.

Indeed, the present candlesticks appear to be cast from the same mold as the set of four marked by Myers made for Catharine Livingston (two are at Yale University Art Gallery, two are at the Metropolitan Museum of Art). The fact the mark on the present candlesticks is struck in the same place (on the sockets) as the Myers marks on the Livingston candlesticks suggests that Parisien acquired them from Myers and overstruck the visible marks, leaving the inconspicuous marks on the nozzles untouched.

Other castings on Parisien-marked silver betray origin in Myers's shop. Barquist notes that the castings on a Parisien-marked coffeepot appear on several coffeepots by Myers and that a handle of a porringer marked by Parisien is from the same mold as those on porringers marked by Myers and the Halsted & Myers partnership. This relationship between the castings of Parisien and Myers had also been observed by Louise Avery, who discovered the same shell-form handle casting on a Parisien mug in the Clearwater Collection and on a Myers mug in the R. T. H. Halsey Collection. In the case of candlesticks, Myers used an English model to make his mold, and the evidence of covered-up hallmarks under the base of his Livingston examples is the same as on the present Parisien-marked pair. (See David L. Barquist, Myer Myers: Jewish Silversmith in Colonial New York, 2001, esp. pp. 58, 119-122, 132, 210, and Louise Avery, American Silver of the XVII & XVIII Centuries, 1920, p. 142, no. 289.)

;

More From Important American Furniture, Silver and Folk Art featuring

View All
View All