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AN IMPERIAL FAMILLE VERTE  CORAL-GROUND 'FLORAL' BOWL
AN IMPERIAL FAMILLE VERTE  CORAL-GROUND 'FLORAL' BOWL
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AN IMPERIAL FAMILLE VERTE CORAL-GROUND 'FLORAL' BOWL

KANGXI YUZHI MARK IN UNDERGLAZE BLUE WITHIN A DOUBLE SQUARE AND OF THE PERIOD (1662-1722)

Details
AN IMPERIAL FAMILLE VERTE CORAL-GROUND 'FLORAL' BOWL
KANGXI YUZHI MARK IN UNDERGLAZE BLUE WITHIN A DOUBLE SQUARE AND OF THE PERIOD (1662-1722)
The bowl is richly decorated to the exterior with blue and yellow peony blossoms encircling the foot, below a variety of exotic blooms enamelled in aubergine, blue, yellow, iron-red and two shades of green, all against an even coral-red ground. The interior is covered with a transparent glaze.
4 1/4 in. (10.8 cm.) diam., box
Provenance
Sold at Christie's Paris, 7 December 2007, lot 141

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Chi Fan Tsang
Chi Fan Tsang

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Lot Essay

A Kangxi-marked bowl of this design in the Shanghai Museum is illustrated in An exhibition of Chinese ceramics from the Collection of the Shanghai Museum, Tokyo, 1984, p. 124, no. 92, and another from the Charles Russell and Paul Bernat Collections, now in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, by H. Moss, By Imperial Command, Hong Kong, 1976, pp. 81-2, pl. 74. Both show the imperial mark and several views of the flowers. Moss goes on to note that Kangxi bowls of this type bear yuzhi marks written in blue or pink enamel, apparently one of the few instances where the Jingdezhen potters received specific instructions as to the style of the underglaze-blue mark which was to appear on a group of pieces made to imperial order.

A Kangxi-marked pair of bowls, formerly from the Edward T. Chow Collection, now in the Tianminlou Foundation, is illustrated in Joined Colors: Decoration and Meaning in Chinese Porcelain: Ceramics from Collectors in the Min Chiu Society, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 1993, p. 94, no. 23. See, also, an example in the Palace Museum, Beijing, in Gugong cang zhuanshi ciqi zhenyan duibi lidai guyao zhibiao ben tulu, p. 192, no. 168, and another from the McElney Collection included in The Inaugural Exhibition of the Museum of East Asian Art, Bath, 1993, vol. I, no. 188.

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