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AN IMPORTANT AND EXCEPTIONALLY RARE HUANGHUALI WAISTED DAYBED, TA
AN IMPORTANT AND EXCEPTIONALLY RARE HUANGHUALI WAISTED DAYBED, TA
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Prospective purchasers are advised that several co… Read more
AN IMPORTANT AND EXCEPTIONALLY RARE HUANGHUALI WAISTED DAYBED, TA

LATE MING DYNASTY, 17TH CENTURY

Details
AN IMPORTANT AND EXCEPTIONALLY RARE HUANGHUALI WAISTED DAYBED, TA
LATE MING DYNASTY, 17TH CENTURY
The well-proportioned bed with rectangular frame enclosing the hard mat seat above a high waist and plain, straight apron supported on sturdy legs of square section terminating in hoof feet, the wood a rich golden color with striking, swirling 'landscape' grain.
18 5/8 in. (47.5 cm.) high, 77 in. (197 cm.) wide, 41 ½ in. (105 cm.) deep
Provenance
Herr J. Plaut.
Christie's, New York, 18 September 1997, lot 180.
Property from a New York City Collection
Christie's New York, 21 September 2000, lot 24
The Heveningham Hall Collection
Literature
Gustav Ecke, Chinese Domestic Furniture, Rutland, Vermont and Tokyo, 1962, pl. 19, no. 15.
Special Notice

Prospective purchasers are advised that several countries prohibit the importation of property containing materials from endangered species, including but not limited to coral, ivory, tortoiseshell and crocodile. Accordingly, prospective purchasers should familiarize themselves with relevant customs regulations prior to bidding if they intend to import this lot into another country.

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Marco Almeida (安偉達)
Marco Almeida (安偉達) Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art

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Lot Essay

The platform bed, or ta, with its simple and restrained lines, represents one of the very few forms to be preserved in classical Chinese furniture design. By the Ming dynasty, platforms with four legs in various sizes had come into favour replacing earlier box-construction platforms. The present lot has a bold and simple design, with restrained lines and no relief decoration that fashioned from thick pieces of beautilfully grained wood, as how it was strikingly illustrated by Gustav Ecke in Chinese Domestic Furniture, 1962 (fig. 1).

The use of the daybed was manifold - during the day, it served as a sitting platform, and at night a bed. In Austere Luminosity of Classical Chinese Furniture, Berkeley, 2001, pp. 105-21, S. Handler discusses the origins and uses of this intriguing form. For a further explanation of the daybed as indoor and outdoor seating during the Ming dynasty, refer to Wang et al., op.cit, p. 6. For paintings depicting daybeds used in the above manner, refer to the Catalogue for the Special Exhibition of Furniture in Paintings, National Palace Museum, Taiwan, 1996, nos. 20 - 23 where scholars are variously depicted seated casually with legs draped over the side of the bed or seated cross-legged with both legs on the mat.

Daybeds with hoof feet and without stretchers are exceptionally rare. A citable example is the wooden model mentioned by Wang Zhengshu in his article, ‘Conjectures on Models of Ming-Period Furniture from the Pan Yunzheng Tomb in Shanghai’, Beyond the Screen, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 1996, pp. 77-83, and illustrated by N. Berliner, op. cit., p. 150, no. 30b.

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