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A LARGE VINCA CLAY FEMALE FIGURE
A LARGE VINCA CLAY FEMALE FIGURE
AN IRISH BRONZE SIDE-BLOW HORN
A LARGE VINCA CLAY FEMALE FIGURE
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PROPERTY FROM A PRINCELY COLLECTION
AN IRISH BRONZE SIDE-BLOW HORN

LATE BRONZE AGE, CIRCA 8TH-7TH CENTURY B.C.

Details
AN IRISH BRONZE SIDE-BLOW HORN
LATE BRONZE AGE, CIRCA 8TH-7TH CENTURY B.C.
24 1/8 in. (61.5) cm. long
Provenance
Possibly found near Derry, circa 1780-1830.
Francis Douce (1757-1834), London.
Sir Samuel Rush Meyrick (1783-1848), Herefordshire, prior to 1830.
Eden Minns, London.
The Property of Eden Minns, Esq; Antiquities and Primitive Art, Christie's, London, 11 July 1973, lot 204.
with Robin Symes, London, 2006.
Literature
J. Skelton, F.S.A., Engraved Illustrations of Antient Armour from the Collection at Goodrich Court, Herefordshire, from the Drawings and with the Descriptions of Dr. Meyrick, London, 1830, pl. XLVII, fig. 16.
J. M. Coles, 'Some Irish Horns of the Late Bronze Age,' in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Vol. 97, part 2, 1967, pp. 113-117, pl. 11 C.
Exhibited
Fanfare for Europe Exhibition, Christie's, January 1973.

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Claudio Corsi Ancient Art & Antiquities

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Lot Essay

The Irish Bronze age is a period characterised by a wealth of innovations, most notably the development of metalworking.
Irish trumpets have long been a subject of interest as they provide invaluable information about Late Bronze Age culture in Ireland.
There are over 90 extant examples, mostly all of which can be found today in museum collections. Many proposed classifications have been made based on decoration, shape and distribution and this horn has been classified by J. M. Coles (op. cit.) as an exceptional example of Class I side-blow . The bell is decorated with eight low bosses and groups of grooves in a linear pattern with a closed end that has a loop and another loop with ring attached placed between this end and the mouth-hole.
The function of these instruments is uncertain. J. M. Coles (op. cit), notes that those that can still be blown have one, or at most two notes; this one produces a note between A and A-flat. It seems probable, therefore, that they were used as a means of transmitting signals than for any musical qualities they may have possessed.

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