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AN IRISH GEORGE II CARVED PINE CHIMNEYPIECE
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AN IRISH GEORGE II CARVED PINE CHIMNEYPIECE

IN THE MANNER OF JOHN KELLY, MID-18TH CENTURY

Details
AN IRISH GEORGE II CARVED PINE CHIMNEYPIECE
IN THE MANNER OF JOHN KELLY, MID-18TH CENTURY
The rectanular breakfront shelf above a cavetto cornice above a frieze with ribbon-tied swags of fruit and flowers below egg-and-dart, with central tablet of a basket of fruit issuing scolling foliage with egg-and-dart moulded border and uprights with ribbon-tied drops of fruit and foliage, previously decorated, with brèche violette inner slip, restorations
60½ in. (153.5 cm.) high; 86¼ in. (219 cm.) wide; 9¼ in. (23.5 cm.) deep
the aperture (without marble slip): 48 x 64½in. (122 x 164 cm.)
Provenance
The Sabatier family, Summergrove, Co. Leix.
Special Notice

No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 15% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis.

Lot Essay

The 'picturesque' chimneypiece frieze of beribboned garlands of fruit and flower relates to patterns in Messrs Crunden, Milton and Columbani's, The Chimney-Piece Maker's Daily Assistant, 1766. It is likely to have been installed for the Huguenot Sabatier family at Summergrove, Co. Leix when it was constructed c. 1760.

It is likely to have been installed for the Huguenot Sabatier family at Summergrove, Co. Leix, when it was constructed c.1760. Summergrove is one of the finest of the smaller country houses of Ireland and is discussed in detail in Maurice Craig's Classic Irish Houses of the Middle Size, Dublin Reprint 2006, pp. 129-133. Pl. 32 shows the inner wall of the of the entrance hall with its tripartite series of doors surmounted by elaborate carved wood decoration with an urn and garlands of flowers. Pl. 34 shows the doorcases again with very fine carving.

The chimneypiece and carving is very much influenced by John Houghton, the pre-eminent Dublin carver of the 18th century and his partner John Kelly (d. 1773). Although Houghton and Kelly are not known to have worked at Summergrove, the chimneypiece and the carving there very much suggests their influence (J. Peill & The Knight Glin, Irish Furniture, New Haven and London, forthcoming publication 2007). Kelly's overdoors, window surrounds and staircase brackets for Dr Mosse's house, 15 Cavendish Row, Dublin, each of excellent quality are illustrated in A. Crookshank & The Knight of Glin, 'Reflections on some eighteenth century Dublin Carvers', Avenues to the Past: Essays Presented to Sir Charles Brett on his 75th Year, Belfast, 2003, pp. 62-65.

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