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AN IZNIK BLUE AND GREEN POTTERY DISH
No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VA… Read more Joseph, Jacques and Jean Soustiel The Soustiel family were important Islamic art dealers who moved to Paris from the east to establish their Islamic gallery in Paris at 146 Boulevard Haussmann. The gallery was founded in 1926 by Joseph Soustiel (1904-1990), a Sephardic Jew whose grandfather Moise (1836-1916) established an antiques business in Thessalonika in 1883. The family business was brought to Istanbul in 1913 by Moise's son Haim (1871-1939) and continuing thence to Paris under Joseph after he emigrated in 1921. Iznik pottery was always one of the great strengths of this family, and two magnificent early Iznk dishes were donated by them to the museum in Bursa. The gallery on Boulevard Haussmann was retained by the family until after the death of Joseph's son Jean Soustiel in 1999 and his half brother Jacques in April 2004.
AN IZNIK BLUE AND GREEN POTTERY DISH

OTTOMAN TURKEY, CIRCA 1570

Details
AN IZNIK BLUE AND GREEN POTTERY DISH
OTTOMAN TURKEY, CIRCA 1570
With curving sides on short foot, the white interior decorated in two shades of cobalt-blue and green with three large bunches of grapes within spiralling tendrils issuing leaves, in a central roundel of three rings, scrolling vines and leaves in the cavetto, in a narrow border of white meander between small blue and green triangles, the exterior with similar scrolls to that of the cavetto between sets of blue rings, with further pair of rings on the base, rim slightly fritted with small areas of restoration, hairline cracks
12 7/8in. (32.6cm.) diam.
Provenance
Jean Soustiel Collection Sold Drouot-Richlieu, Paris, (de Riqlès), 6 December 1999, lot 291
Exhibited
Musée Jacquemart Andre, Paris, Splendeurs de la Céramique Ottomane, 1 April - 2 July 2000 (ex catalogue).
Special Notice

No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 17.5% will be added to the buyer's premium, which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis.

Lot Essay

The development of this design form the early Ming Chinese original is clear, although no precise model for this survives at the Topkapi Palace. It was either therefore a combination of two models, one for the interior and another for the exterior (Regina Krahl: Chinese ceramics in the Topkapi Saray Museum, London, 1986, nos.604 and 606 for example), or it represents a dish which was formerly in the Topkapi and was either sold or broken and disposed of. Of the group this is an early example in the development, with its very clear colouring and the very angular branch from which the grapes hang. Another very similar dish was in the Barlow Collection (Nurhan Atasoy and Julian Raby: Iznik, the Pottery of Ottoman Turkey, London, 1989, no.717). For examples of the other well known form of grape dish please see lots 50 and 60 in this sale.
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