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AN UNUSUAL GEORGE III ORMOLU AND CUT GLASS 'CANDLESTICK CLOCK' TIMEPIECE
AN UNUSUAL GEORGE III ORMOLU AND CUT GLASS 'CANDLESTICK CLOCK' TIMEPIECE

LATE 18TH CENTURY, ATTRIBUTED TO WILLIAM PARKER, THE GILT GLASS PEDESTAL POSSIBLY DECORATED BY JAMES GILES

Details
AN UNUSUAL GEORGE III ORMOLU AND CUT GLASS 'CANDLESTICK CLOCK' TIMEPIECE LATE 18TH CENTURY, ATTRIBUTED TO WILLIAM PARKER, THE GILT GLASS PEDESTAL POSSIBLY DECORATED BY JAMES GILES CASE: the drum-shaped glazed ormolu case with pineapple glass finial, cut-glass canopy below suspended with pendants, the concave sided blue glass pedestal base gilt-decorated with paterae and swags, rams' masks to the angles, the spreading plinth raised on ball feet DIAL: the 3 inch white enamel dial with Roman hours and Arabic minutes, pierced gilt hands MOVEMENT: the four pillar single train timepiece movement with chain fusee and balance wheel verge escapement, unsigned, the underside of the urn with fitting stamped 'B', with associated glass dome 15¾ in. (40 cm.) high; 4¾ in. (12 cm.) wide
Provenance
Almost certainly F. Jones, Tavistock Street, Bedford, 25 March 1931, as an 18th century ormolu clock with cut-glass pendants (£121.12).
Literature
C. Hussey, 'Avenue House, Ampthill, Bedfordshire, The Residence of Prof. A.E. Richardson, F.S.A., F.R.I.B.A.', Country Life, 8 December 1934, p.615, fig.3, where illustrated in the Saloon.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE:
Exhibition catalogue, Country House Lighting 1660-1890, Temple Newsam Country House Studies, No.4, pp. 44-45, catalogue No. 10.
M. Mortimer, The English Glass Chandelier, Suffolk, 2000, p. 15, colour pl. 6 & pp. 96-97, pls. 42 & 43

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Lot Essay

This rare and apparently unrecorded clock is closely related to a form of table candelabra attributed to the firm of William Parker. His patent of 28 March 1781 may well refer to this particular type and notes that this was a new method for making 'the pedestals or supports for candlesticks, girandoles, chandeliers, candelabrums, lamps, candle shades, eparns, clocks...' (see Country House Lighting 1660-1890, op. cit., p. 45).
The decoration to the glass is possibly by James Giles, one of the finest 18th Century glass and porcelain decorators. Working from London, and of Huguenot descent, Giles fabricated gilt and enamelled objects in the neoclassical style. Indeed Giles and Parker were strong business associates, with Giles' ledgers between 1771 and 1774 showing purchases totalling £234.7.8 from Parker's glass warehouse (see A. McConnell, 'James Giles' Decoration', The Magazine Antiques, 10 October 2003, pp. 142-151). A set of four candelabra with this patent base are at Chatsworth (see Mortimer op. cit. p. 97, plate 43), recorded in Parker's bill to the Duke of Devonshire of 1782-3.

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