Anne Estelle Rice (1877-1959)
Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's… Read more
Anne Estelle Rice (1877-1959)

Summer Flowers

Details
Anne Estelle Rice (1877-1959)
Summer Flowers
signed 'ANNE Estelle RICE' (lower right)
oil on panel
21 x 16¼ in. (53.5 x 42 cm.)
Provenance
The artist's estate, and by descent.
Special notice

Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.

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André Zlattinger
André Zlattinger

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Lot Essay

Anne Estelle Rice was born to Irish-American parents in Conchohocken, Philadelphia in 1877 and studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in her home city and worked for a time as an illustrator for the North American and Saturday Evening Post, but it was during her time in France in the early part of the twentieth century that her distinctive style developed. Rice first visited France in 1905 and it was during the period that followed that she met John Duncan Fergusson who was delighted by her beauty, intellect and talent. She became a member of the Societaire de Salon d'Automne a year later, around the time that she held her first solo exhibition in London, at the Baillie Gallery.

Kirsten Simister points out 'Rice's vivacious personality provided a good match for Fergusson. She shared his curiosity and love of adventure, breaking with social convention in order to accompany him to venues that were considered unacceptable to women'. In 1908 she received a commission from Wanamaker's Department Store in Philadelphia. By 1911 Rice had become a regular and significant contributor to Fergusson's journal Rhythm and they became extremely important to one another, both romantically and professionally. Although their relationship did not last long and despite spending much of her time in London rather than Paris, the influence of Fergusson remained strong in her work.
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