ANONYMOUS (17TH-19TH CENTURY)
ANONYMOUS (17TH-19TH CENTURY)

Tiger and Magpie

Details
ANONYMOUS (17TH-19TH CENTURY)
Tiger and Magpie
With spurious signature Tangyin (Tang Yin; 1470-1524)
Hanging scroll; ink and color on silk
65 3/8 x 33 7/8 in. (166.1 x 86 cm.)

Brought to you by

Takaaki Murakami(村上高明)
Takaaki Murakami(村上高明) Vice President, Specialist and Head of Department | Korean Art

Lot Essay

The feline face, long vertical stripes, clawed paws, and long tail identify the beast with those markings as a tiger, which is regarded as a guardian that wards away evil spirits and a sacred creature that brings good fortune. Though not one of the Four Directional Deities, or Sasin—a term referring to the mythical animals guarding the four cardinal directions: Azure Dragon of the East, White Tiger of the West, Black Tortoise-and-Serpent of the North and Vermilion Bird of the South—the tiger has long been associated with Korea and Korean culture, and it figures in Korea’s foundation mythology. In fact, the oldest Korean historical records that mention the tiger associate it with Dangun, Korea’s legendary founding father. The tiger is often shown together with a pine tree and an auspicious bird, magpie.
Tang Yin (1470–1524) was one of the most important Chinese artists from mid-Ming dynasty and the inscribed date of Xinmao year corresponds to 1471 or 1531, which seems implausible during Tang’s lifetime.
For a similar painting in the Okada Museum of Art, see Kobayashi Tadashi, ed., Masterpieces of the Okada Museum of Art, vol. 2 (Kanagawa: Okada Museum of Art, 2018), no. 93.

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