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Barry Flanagan (1941-2009)

Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.
Barry Flanagan (1941-2009)

(i) Light Red (ii) Dark Blue

Details
Barry Flanagan (1941-2009) (i) Light Red (ii) Dark Blue (i) signed with artist's initials, titled and dated 'bf - light red 73/78' (on the reverse of the wooden element) (ii) signed with artist's initials, titled and dated 'bf - dark blue 73/78' (on the reverse of the wooden element) hessian, oil, string and dowling (i) 53 x 22 x 6½in. (134.6 x 56 x 16.5cm.) (ii) 52¾ x 23 5/8 x 6 5/8in. (134 x 60 x 16.7cm.) Executed in 1973-78
Provenance
(i) Waddington Galleries, London.
Anon. sale, Sotheby's New York, 25 February 1993, lot 309.
Acquired at the above sale by the present owner.
(ii) Waddington Galleries, London.
Anon. sale, Sotheby's New York, 18 November 1992, lot 215.
Acquired at the above sale by the present owner.
Literature
(i) Barry Flanagan, exh. cat., Madrid, Fundación "la Caixa", 1993-1994 (illustrated, p. 73).
Exhibited
(i) Paris, Galerie de France, Peintres Anglais 1960-80, 1980. Newcastle, Laing Art Gallery, Barry Flanagan, A Visual Invitation: Sculpture 1967-1987, 1987-1988 (illustrated in colour, p. 37). This exhibition later travelled to Belgrade, Museum of Contemporary Art; Zagreb, Zagreb City Art Gallery and Ljubljana, Moderna Galerija.
(ii) London, Waddington Galleries, Group IV, 1981 (illustrated, unpaged).
Newcastle, Laing Art Gallery, Barry Flanagan, A Visual Invitation: Sculpture 1967-1987, 1987-1988 (illustrated in colour, p. 37). This exhibition later travelled to Belgrade, Museum of Contemporary Art; Zagreb, Zagreb City Art Gallery and Ljubljana, Moderna Galerija.
Special Notice

Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.
Post Lot Text
Executed in 1973-1978, Light Red and Dark Blue are two iconic fabric works by the artist. With other examples recently exhibited at Tate Britain, London in the major retrospective of the artist's work, they draw parallels with the soft sculpture of Robert Morris including his Felt Piece (1967-1968) exhibited at When Attitudes Become Form, ICA, London in 1969. Flanagan was attracted to the possibilities of canvas, thread and cord, installing it in numerous configurations: 'wall-mounting it, stretching or hanging it or leaning it against a wall or in a corner, or balanced with sticks fixed to the floor with plasticine to prevent slipping' (J. Melvin, 'No thing to say', Barry Flanagan: Early Works 1965-1982, exh. cat., Tate Britain, London, 2011, p. 59). In Light Red and Dark Blue it is through the suspension of the large-scale felt works from a wall, confronting the viewer with a condensed blast of brilliant colour. Flanagan accounted for his interest in sculpture and in particular the mediated position of soft canvas sculpture by explaining: 'the convention of painting always bothered me. There always seemed to be a way of painting. With sculpture you always seemed to be working directly, with materials and with the physical world inventing your own organisations' (B. Flanagan quoted in J. Melvin, 'No thing to say', Barry Flanagan: Early Works 1965-1982, exh. cat., Tate Britain, London, 2011, p. 59).

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Lot Essay

Executed in 1973-1978, Light Red and Dark Blue are two iconic fabric works by the artist. With other examples recently exhibited at Tate Britain, London in the major retrospective of the artist's work, they draw parallels with the soft sculpture of Robert Morris including his Felt Piece (1967-1968) exhibited at When Attitudes Become Form, ICA, London in 1969. Flanagan was attracted to the possibilities of canvas, thread and cord, installing it in numerous configurations: 'wall-mounting it, stretching or hanging it or leaning it against a wall or in a corner, or balanced with sticks fixed to the floor with plasticine to prevent slipping' (J. Melvin, 'No thing to say', Barry Flanagan: Early Works 1965-1982, exh. cat., Tate Britain, London, 2011, p. 59). In Light Red and Dark Blue it is through the suspension of the large-scale felt works from a wall, confronting the viewer with a condensed blast of brilliant colour. Flanagan accounted for his interest in sculpture and in particular the mediated position of soft canvas sculpture by explaining: 'the convention of painting always bothered me. There always seemed to be a way of painting. With sculpture you always seemed to be working directly, with materials and with the physical world inventing your own organisations' (B. Flanagan quoted in J. Melvin, 'No thing to say', Barry Flanagan: Early Works 1965-1982, exh. cat., Tate Britain, London, 2011, p. 59).

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