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[CAPE BRETON]. National Prejudice, Opposed to the National Interest, Candidly Considered in the Detention or Yielding up Gibraltar and Cape-Briton by the Ensuing Treaty of Peace: With some Observations on the Natural Jealousy of the Spanish Nation, and how far it may Operate to the Prejudice of the British Commerce if not removed at this Crisis. In a Letter to Sir John Barnard, Knight. London: Printed for W. Owen and J. Swan, 1748.
[CAPE BRETON]. National Prejudice, Opposed to the National Interest, Candidly Considered in the Detention or Yielding up Gibraltar and Cape-Briton by the Ensuing Treaty of Peace: With some Observations on the Natural Jealousy of the Spanish Nation, and how far it may Operate to the Prejudice of the British Commerce if not removed at this Crisis. In a Letter to Sir John Barnard, Knight. London: Printed for W. Owen and J. Swan, 1748.

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[CAPE BRETON]. National Prejudice, Opposed to the National Interest, Candidly Considered in the Detention or Yielding up Gibraltar and Cape-Briton by the Ensuing Treaty of Peace: With some Observations on the Natural Jealousy of the Spanish Nation, and how far it may Operate to the Prejudice of the British Commerce if not removed at this Crisis. In a Letter to Sir John Barnard, Knight. London: Printed for W. Owen and J. Swan, 1748.

8o (205 x 118 mm). (Some minor browning.) Disbound.

FIRST EDITION. A trenchant criticism of the popular British determination to retain possession of the recently conquered island of Cape Breton. While the conquest was unexpected, the anonymous author claims, and did much to raise the reputation of the British naval force, the enhancing of the victory led to an exaggeration of its importance. Not only does he maintain British obstinacy in this regard to be a major stumbling block to the conclusion of peace with France, but he also endeavors to expose that there is absolutely no advantage, either commercial or political, in the British retention of the "useless and expensive" island: "... the Benefits arising from our Possession of that Island for fifty Years to come, would not compensate for the Expence of maintaining it for a single Year. The Soil produces nothing, or next to nothing; the Climate is so excessively bad and unwholesome, that not many survive a very few Months Residence there; and the Nature of the Stone is such as well as that of the Air, that the present Fortifications of Louisbourg, which cost France so many Millions since the Peace of Utrecht, are now ready to crumble to pieces; insomuch, that in very few Years, if we should detain the Island, we should be obliged to expend perhaps half a Million in rebuilding that Fortress, and the adjacent Works, or desert that Island. But this is not all neither; for whether Cape Breton be considered as an Accession or Enlargement to our Fishing Trade in the North, or as an additional Security to that lucrative Commerce, we shall find it equally inconsiderable. The Island is contiguous to none of the noted Fishing-banks, nor are its own Coasts abounding in Fish, which we must suppose was the Reason why the French had never established a Fishery there ..." RARE. Not in Howes, Streeter, Can. Arch., T.P.L., Vlach, Gagnon, Dionne or Lande. Sabin 52015; Waldon, p. 317-8.
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