Lot Content

COVID-19 Important notice Read More
Emil Schumacher (1912-1999)

Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.
FROM THE COLLECTION OF GIORGIO PIACENZA (DASSU)
Emil Schumacher (1912-1999)

Piacenza

Details
Emil Schumacher (1912-1999) Piacenza signed and dated 'Schumacher 62' (lower right) oil on canvas 100 x 80 cm. Painted in 1962
Provenance
Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner.
Special Notice

Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.

Brought to you by

Alexandra Bots
Alexandra Bots All Lots

Lot Essay

The authenticity of this work has been kindly confirmed by Dr. Ulrich Schumacher and the work will be included in the forthcoming catalogue raisonné under n. 0/4.598.

'Painting means transforming material into another state.'
(Emil Schumacher cited in: Exh. cat. Städtische Galerie im Städel, Frankfurt am Main, Emil Schumacher, p. 92).

Since the 1950's Schumacher started experimenting with the material structure of painting.
The present work is an important example of his sensual style of the sixties, where the monochromatic reduction of colour is delicately interrupted by the incised, structured line. Centering the image, the line becomes like a caligraphic symbol, only suggesting the impact of the artist's gesture.

The impastoed paint is interrupted by dark lines carved into the surface, recalling geological formations seen from above - like seismic fault lines, or the breaking apart of dried clay.
Paint is here the essential, the primeval element, not just the tool for creating an image, but rather the subject of art itself. The peaceful though occasionally vehement movement of the picture suggests that things have not come to a standstill.
As Rudi Fuchs wrote: 'One senses that working the surface, employing it as a field of expression, independent almost from the framework of drawing, is already emerging in Schumachers' mind as possibility.' (cited in: ibid, p. 10)

'It is important to me that the observer can grasp the genesis of a picture, but I always find explanations completely superfluous. If a picture does not touch the observer directly then there is something missing. The picture stands for itself; What you intended no longer matters. The picture exists and makes an effect' (1972) (Emil Schumacher as cited in: Exh.cat. Emil Schumacher, Malerei/Painting 1936 - 1991, Städtische Galerie im Städel, Frankfurt 1992, p. 81).

More From Post-War and Contemporary Art

View All
View All