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Marlene Dumas (b. 1953)
Marlene Dumas (b. 1953)
Marlene Dumas (b. 1953)
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Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's… Read more ART FOR FUTURE – SELECTED WORKS FROM THE UNICREDIT GROUP
Fritz Wotruba (1907-1975)

Weibliche Kathedrale (Female Cathedral)

Details
Fritz Wotruba (1907-1975)
Weibliche Kathedrale (Female Cathedral)
incised with artist’s signature and number 'WOTRUBA 3/3' (on the reverse lower edge)
bronze with dark brown patina
183 x 66 x 63cm.
Executed in 1946, this work is number three from an edition of three
Provenance
E. M. Mautner, Vienna.
Acquired from the above by the present owner in 1973.
Literature
F. Heer, Fritz Wotruba: Humanität aus dem Stein, Neuchâtel 1961 (another example in stone illustrated, pp. 26- 27).
O. Breicha, Fritz Wotruba: Figur als Widerstand, Zell am See 1977 (another one from the edition illustrated in colour, p. 50).
Special Notice

Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.
21% VAT applies to both the hammer price and the buyer’s premium. The buyer’s premium is calculated for each lot as 25% of the hammer price up to a value of €200,000, plus 20% of the hammer price between €200,001 to €2,500,000, plus 13.5% of any amount in excess of €2,500,001.

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Elvira Jansen
Elvira Jansen

Lot Essay

Weibliche Kathdrale marks a crucial moment in the career of Fritz Wotruba, both stylistically and in the wider context of his socio-political ideals. It was cast from the sandstone original Wotruba created in 1946 from found rubble of the cathedral Stefansdom in Vienna after its bombing in 1945. He created a female figure out of this most significant piece of war debris, deliberately keeping its characteristics of destruction and eschewing over-stylization.
Considered one of the most notable sculptors of the 20th century in Austria, Wotruba was and is known for his radical slab like metal and stone sculpture, and for being intensely engaged with the social and political questions of his era. Wotruba felt that art was a vehicle of enlightenment, with a mission to renew culture and society - a view that no doubt fuelled his work with monuments and, later, architecture (the 1932 memorial Man Condemn War in Leobe, and the Church of the Holy Trinity he designed in 1971 are some notable examples).
Born in 1907, as the son of a poor tailor in Vienna, Wotruba initially worked as a metal grinder and engraver, taking up sculpture in 1925. He fled to Switzerland in 1939 to escape the Nazi invasion. While in exile, Wotruba met Marino Marini, Germaine Richier and Uli and Dana Becher who markedly influenced his work. When Wotruba returned to Vienna in 1945, he was given a post at the Vienna Art Academy and would increasingly emancipate his practice from anatomical realism and rather look to structural and tectonic considerations in his creation process.

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