GRAYSON PERRY (B. 1960)
GRAYSON PERRY (B. 1960)
GRAYSON PERRY (B. 1960)
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GRAYSON PERRY (B. 1960)
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Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's… Read more
GRAYSON PERRY (B. 1960)

I was an angry working-class man

Details
GRAYSON PERRY (B. 1960)
I was an angry working-class man
glazed earthenware
22 x 10 ¼ x 10 ¼in. (56 x 26 x 26cm.)
Executed in 2001
Provenance
Laurent Delaye Gallery, London.
Private Collection, USA.
Anon. sale, Christie's London, 7 October 2016, lot 305.
Acquired at the above sale by the present owner.
Literature
J. Klein, Grayson Perry, London 2009 (illustrated in colour, p. 44).
Exhibited
London, Tate Britain, Turner Prize 2003: Jake & Dinos Chapman, Willie Doherty, Anya Gallaccio, Grayson Perry, 2003-2004 (illustrated in colour, unpaged).
Special notice

Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.

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Anna Touzin
Anna Touzin Specialist, Head of Day Sale

Lot Essay

‘I was a very angry working-class man! ...The title is important and every word counts. I ‘was’ is in the past tense, in that I hope I’m getting over my inappropriate temper now through therapy. ‘Working-class’, in that, by the very nature of being a successful artist one does leave one’s class to a certain extent. ‘Man’ is a joke on me being a transvestite ... It’s about occupying the world that I do, making lovely, delicate ceramic things, and yet being a working-class man.’ - Grayson Perry

Included in Grayson Perry’s award-winning Turner Prize exhibition in 2003, I was an angry working-class man (2001) embodies the artist’s vibrant inner landscape, depicted here as a medley of calligraphic imagery. Across the vase’s lustrous surface, Perry has woven a tapestry of hand drawings, transfer prints, and decorative motifs, all of which riff on more conventional decorative art subjects. In a delicate palette of dusty pink, pale violet and shimmering gold, I was an angry working-class man reveals a pictorial opera drawn from a working-class iconography; the work’s title combines references to the artist’s own psychological, sexual, and economic background. Using traditional chinoiserie methods, Perry upends what he has described as ‘the apotheosis of the English middle-class drawing room aesthetic’ (G. Perry, quoted in J. Klein, Grayson Perry, London 2009, p. 44). In challenging ceramic’s status as a purely decorative and domestic medium, the vase presents a poignant self-portrait that reflects Perry’s own multifaceted identity.

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