Gustav Klimt (1862-1918)
PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE BELGIAN COLLECTION
Gustav Klimt (1862-1918)

Schwebende nach rechts, Wiederholung der Hände

Details
Gustav Klimt (1862-1918)
Schwebende nach rechts, Wiederholung der Hände
signed 'G.KLIMT. R' (lower centre) and inscribed 'R' (lower left)
charcoal on paper
12 1/8 x 17 ½ in. (31.2 x 44.5 cm.)
Drawn in 1901
Provenance
(Probably) Carl Reininghaus, Vienna, by whom acquired directly from the artist in 1903.
Private collection, Geneva; sale, Galerie Kornfeld, Bern, 21 June 1990, lot 608.
Piccadilly Gallery, London.
Acquired from the above by the present owner.
Literature
A. Strobl, Gustav Klimt, Die Zeichnungen, vol. IV, Nachtrag, 1878-1918, Salzburg, 1989, no. 3446, p. 110 (illustrated p. 111).

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Annie Wallington
Annie Wallington

Lot Essay


The present work is a study for Die Sehnsucht nach Lust (The Longing for Happiness) portion of Gustav Klimt's 34-metre-long Beethoven Frieze, created in 1902 as an interpretation of Beethoven’s 9th Symphony by Richard Wagner. Klimt’s Beethoven Frieze was conceived as a celebration of humankind’s desire for happiness in a suffering and tempestuous world in which one contends not only with external evil forces, but also with internal weaknesses. The frieze begins with a long wall of floating Genii, gliding female figures symbolising the longing for happiness, one of whom is depicted in the present work. It then continues with a shorter end wall devoted to hostile forces, and is followed by the final wall where yearning for happiness finds appeasement in Poetry and five female figures representing the ideal realm, a place of pure joy, pure happiness, pure love. The frieze concludes with a choir of angels singing in paradise and the powerful image of a kissing couple.
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