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Henri Matisse (1869-1954)
PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF ALAN DERSHOWITZ AND CAROLYN COHEN
Henri Matisse (1869-1954)

Marocain, de trois-quarts

Details
Henri Matisse (1869-1954)
Marocain, de trois-quarts
signed and dated 'Henri Matisse 1913' (lower right)
pen and black ink on paper
9 7/8 x 7¾ in. (25 x 19.6 cm.)
Drawn in 1913
Provenance
Anon. sale, Sotheby's, New York, 7 November 1991, lot 190.
Anon. sale, Christie's, London, 29 June 2000, lot 549.
Acquired at the above sale by the present owners.
Exhibited
Washington, D.C., National Gallery of Art; New York, The Museum of Modern Art; Moscow, State Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts and Leningrad, The State Hermitage Museum, Matisse in Morocco, March 1990-February 1991, pp. 131 and 177, no. 47 (illustrated).
Paris, Institute du monde arabe, Le Maroc de Matisse, October 1999-January 2000, p. 231 (illustrated, fig. 95).
Sale Room Notice
Wanda de Guébriant has confirmed the authenticity of this work.

Please note the additional provenance for this work:
Anon. sale, Sotheby's, New York, 7 November 1991, lot 190.
Anon. sale, Christie's, London, 29 June 2000, lot 549.
Acquired at the above sale by the present owners.

Please note the additional exhibition information for this work:
Paris, Institute du monde arabe, Le Maroc de Matisse, October
1999-January 2000, p. 231 (illustrated, fig. 95).

Condition Report

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Lot Essay

Wanda de Guébriant has confirmed the authenticity of this work.

The present work comes from a group of drawings referred to as Matisse's Moroccan Sketchbooks. Only recently discovered in a European private collection prior to the 1990 Matisse in Morocco exhibition, they are believed to be from the artist's second trip to Tangiers in the fall of 1912, which extended into 1913. It was during this period that Matisse painted Le rifain assis, now in the collection of The Barnes Foundation. Speaking of the sketchbooks, Jack Cowart observed that "Matisse described his Riffian subject as magnificent, with eyes a bit savage, like a jackal, thinking him also a little feline. There is so little underdrawing on the canvases of his Moroccan figure paintings that such sketchbook drawings must show Matisse perfecting his eye and hand for the essentials of the human subject. His graphite or his pen and ink lines are his preparation for the images that will be made by the strokes of his brush" (op. cit., Matisse in Morocco, exh. cat., p. 130).

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