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[HUNT, James Henry Leigh & John HUNT (editors)] The Examiner. A Sunday Paper, on Politics, Domestic Economy, and Theatricals, London: John Hunt, 1808-16, 1823-24, 1829, 1831-32, 14 volumes only, 2 vols. (1831-32) 2°, the rest 4°, contemporary half calf (shattered, all boards detached, but internally sound and well stitched). Sold as a periodical not subject to return. (14)

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[HUNT, James Henry Leigh & John HUNT (editors)] The Examiner. A Sunday Paper, on Politics, Domestic Economy, and Theatricals, London: John Hunt, 1808-16, 1823-24, 1829, 1831-32, 14 volumes only, 2 vols. (1831-32) 2°, the rest 4°, contemporary half calf (shattered, all boards detached, but internally sound and well stitched). Sold as a periodical not subject to return. (14)

Lot Essay

"At the beginning of the year 1808, my brother John and myself set up the weekly paper of the Examiner in joint partnership," Leigh Hunt wrote in his Autobiography (Ch. IX), "It was named after the Examiner of Swift and his brother Tories. I did not think of their politics. I thought only of their wit and fine writing, which, in my youthful confidence, I proposed to myself to emulate; and I could find no previous political journal equally qualified to be its godfather." Leigh Hunt was to remain the editor for 13 years, including his 2 years in jail. This run, though interrupted, begins with issue No. 1 Sunday, January 3, 1808, and ends with issue no. 1300 on Sunday, December 30, 1832; it includes the famous or notorious issue for March 22, 1812, which led to the prosecution and imprisonment of the two editors. Most importantly, it was in the Examiner that Leigh Hunt, having brought about a first meeting between Keats and Shelley, introduced the two poets to the public at large.

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