Home page

Global notice COVID-19 Important notice
Ivon Hitchens (1893-1979)
1 More
Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's… Read more
Ivon Hitchens (1893-1979)

Still Life with Azaleas

Details
Ivon Hitchens (1893-1979)
Still Life with Azaleas
signed and dated 'IVON HITCHENS.31' (lower right), signed again, inscribed and dated again twice '"Still Life Azaleas. 1931"/by Ivon Hitchens./Greenleaves. Lavington Common./Petworth. Sussex.' (on two artist's labels attached to the stretcher)
oil on canvas
24 x 20 in. (61 x 50.8 cm.)
Painted in 1931.
Provenance
Purchased directly from the artist by the present owner, circa 1973.
Literature
Exhibition Catalogue, The Flower Show: An Exhibition on the Theme of Flowers in Twentieth Century British Art, Stoke-On-Trent, City Museum and Art Gallery, 1986, pp. 39-40, no. 56, illustrated.
Exhibition catalogue, Ivon Hitchens, Newtown, Oriel 31,1987, pp. 24, 40, no. 2, illustrated.
Exhibition catalogue, The Modern Show: British Art from Private Collections 1908-1958, Leeds, Harewood House, 2006, p. 26, exhibition not numbered, illustrated.
Exhibited
Stoke-on-Trent, City Museum and Art Gallery, The Flower Show: An Exhibition on the Theme of Flowers in Twentieth Century British Art, July - September 1986, no. 56: this exhibition travelled to York, City City Art Gallery, September - October 1986; Southampton, City Art Gallery, Novermber - January 1987; and Durham, D.L.I. Museum & Arts Centre, January - February 1987.
Newtown, Oriel 31, Ivon Hitchens, August - September 1987, no. 2.
Leeds, Harewood House, The Modern Show: British Art from Private Collections 1908-1958, March - June 2006, exhibition not numbered.
Special Notice

Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.

Brought to you by

Philip Harley
Philip Harley Head of Sale

Lot Essay


This early flower painting, dating from Hitchens’ London years, has a hard-edge definition of form not found in his later work. The forms are clearly articulated but also flattened, layered and overlapping, the space tilted up to the picture plane, in a typically post-cubist manner which emphasises structural analysis. The colour is carefully arranged in rich contrasts, but does not yet have the spontaneous brushing and soft edges of the later flower pictures. It is, however, a vigorous and innovative composition, a key early work full of formal experiment despite the essentially representational quality of the imagery. Hitchens wrote later: ‘I should like things to fall into place with so clear a notation that the spectator's eye and “aesthetic ear” shall receive a clear message, a clear tune. Every part should be an inevitable part of the whole. I seek to recreate the truth of nature by making my own song about it (in paint).’

A.L.

More from The Delighted Eye: Works from the Collection of Allen and Beryl Freer

View All
View All