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JEFFERSON, THOMAS, President. Invitation signed ("Th:Jefferson") to Thomas W[alker] Gilmer, Monticello, 13 November [1824]. 1 page, oblong 8vo, 80 x 200mm. (3 x 7 3/4 in.), minor browning, edges a bit worn, glazed and matted with portraits of Lafayette and Jefferson in a handsome wood frame,. [With:] An address panel (letter not present) envelope addressed in an unidentified to "Thomas Jefferson, Esq Monticello."

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JEFFERSON, THOMAS, President. Invitation signed ("Th:Jefferson") to Thomas W[alker] Gilmer, Monticello, 13 November [1824]. 1 page, oblong 8vo, 80 x 200mm. (3 x 7 3/4 in.), minor browning, edges a bit worn, glazed and matted with portraits of Lafayette and Jefferson in a handsome wood frame,. [With:] An address panel (letter not present) envelope addressed in an unidentified to "Thomas Jefferson, Esq Monticello."

JEFFERSON INVITES A FUTURE GOVERNOR TO DINE WITH THE MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE AT MONTICELLO

An invitation to an important affair at Monticello: "Th[omas] Jefferson asks the favor of Mr. Thomas W. Wilmer to dine at Monticello to-day with Gen[era]l La Fayette..." The invitation refers to Marquis de Lafayette's visit to Monticello, on his triumphal visit to America in the fall of 1824. It was his first meeting with Jefferson since the Revolutionary War. On 5 November Lafayette was guest of honor at the "...inaugural ceremonies for the University of Virginia. Beneath the high dome of the Rotunda, at a three-hour dinner, Jefferson, now eighty-one, seated between Lafayette and Madison...toasted [him]..." (Randall, Thomas Jefferson: A Life, New York, 1994, p. 588). "Before he left, on the morning of November 15, the old friends reminisced about the American and French revolutions, discussed the low state of political liberty in Europe and the problem of slavery in the United States...[Lafayette's]...main party had enjoyed Jefferson's hospitality for ten days. He had to replenish his stock of red wine after their departure (Dumas Malone, Thomas Jefferson: The Sage of Monticello,, p. 408).

Thomas Walker Gilmer (1802-1844), was the grandson of Dr. George Gilmer had recently returned from Europe where he had gone to recruit professors for the soon-to-open University of Virginia (for details see Malone, pp.409). He became Virginia's Governor in 1840.
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