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Joan Miro (1893-1983) and Josep Llorens Artigas (1892-1980)
Joan Miro (1893-1983) and Josep Llorens Artigas (1892-1980)
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Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.
These lots have been imported from outside the EU for sale using a Temporary Import regime. Import VAT is payable (at 5%) on the Hammer price. VAT is also payable (at 20%) on the buyer’s Premium on a VAT inclusive basis. When a buyer of such a lot has registered an EU address but wishes to export the lot or complete the import into another EU country, he must advise Christie's immediately after the auction.
CALDER & MIRO IN INDIA: WORKS FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION
Joan Miro (1893-1983) and Josep Llorens Artigas (1892-1980)

Vase

Details
Joan Miro (1893-1983) and Josep Llorens Artigas (1892-1980) Vase partially painted and glazed earthenware vase height: 13½in. (34.6cm.) Executed in 1941-1944, this vase is unique
Provenance
Galerie Maeght, Paris.
Gira Sarabhai, Ahmedabad.
Acquired from the above by the present owners.
Literature
J. Prevert, G. Ribemont-Dessaigned, Joan Miro, Paris 1956, p. 200-201.
J. Pierre, J. Corredor-Matheos, Céramiques de Miro et Artigas, Paris 1974, no. 8, p. 201.
F. Miralles, Llorens Artigas, Barcelona 1992, no. 562, p. 254.
J. P Miro & J. G Artigas, Joan Miro, Josep Llorens Artigas. Ceramic, catalogue raisonné 1941-1981, Paris 2007, no. 6, p. 32 (illustrated).
Special Notice

Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.
These lots have been imported from outside the EU for sale using a Temporary Import regime. Import VAT is payable (at 5%) on the Hammer price. VAT is also payable (at 20%) on the buyer’s Premium on a VAT inclusive basis. When a buyer of such a lot has registered an EU address but wishes to export the lot or complete the import into another EU country, he must advise Christie's immediately after the auction.
Sale Room Notice
Please note that this lot should not be marked with an STAR symbol as in the printed catalogue, and as such no VAT is payable on the Hammer price, the usual 20% VAT on the Buyer’s Premium will still be applicable.

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Katharine Arnold
Katharine Arnold Head of Sale

Lot Essay

‘The requirements of ceramics altered Miró’s line, simplified his colours, exaggerated his rhythms. He dove into nature’s vast reserve, which surrounded him and the abandoned objects that he gathered. We run into his familiar themes, but the bird and the woman, serpents and stars have changed worlds and have submitted to ceramic’s materiality as well as to the rules of its game. The union of line and real space, of colour and substance, recaptures the primitive resonance of his savage paintings. Here, it is the flames of the kiln, after a slow alchemical process, that perform the integration of mind into matter’ —J. DUPIN


Filled with the raw energy and spontaneous, amorphous forms that characterise Joan Miró’s style, this unique ceramic, titled Vase, dates from the artist’s earliest collaborations with his friend and fellow artist, Josep Llorens Artigas. Here, form and colour appear suspended in almost balletic tension with one another, as the fluid strokes of the artist’s brush fill the gently curving surface with symbols and characters plucked from Miró’s highly personal, biomorphic symbolic system, their stark black outlines filled with swathes of glowing pigment. Appearing for the first time at auction, Vase was formally in the private collection of the pioneering architect, Gira Sarabhai, whose family’s patronage of the arts transformed the cultural scene in Ahmedabad after the Indian Independence Act. Known for their efforts to foster creativity and innovation in a variety of fields, the Sarabhais nurtured a wide network of international relationships, hosting such luminaries as Le Corbusier, Alexander Calder and Robert Rauschenberg at their home, and creating a richly creative environment for their artistic friends to work in.

Miró’s ceramics were the product of his close relationship with Josep Llorens Artigas, a highly skilled artist who’s work in the medium focused on creating unique pieces that expressed the personality of their creator. Their friendship blossomed during their early years in Barcelona, where the pair met at the Cercle Artístic de Sant Lluc in 1912, and then during their studies together at the art school run by Francesc Galí. Both artists moved to Paris in the 1920s, where their paths often crossed and overlapped, as they each forged an artistic career for themselves. Their long, and highly productive collaboration in ceramics began towards the end of the Second World War as they both found themselves once again in Spain in the summer of 1944. Artigas’s studio was filled with vases and pots that had been slightly misshapen or discoloured during the first stage of the firing process, and Miró was fascinated by the irregular forms and unique hues of this vast array of beautifully crafted objects. Choosing the vases he found most intriguing, Miró began to paint directly on to their surfaces, with Artigas producing a series of special glazes for him to use. These allowed Miró to achieve a greater luminosity in his forms, the fluid glaze providing more vibrant, brighter, and translucent hues than traditional materials.

As Jacques Dupin has explained, these experiments in ceramics allowed Miró to explore new creative avenues, opening his highly personal artistic language to new possibilities: ‘The requirements of ceramics altered Miró’s line, simplified his colours, exaggerated his rhythms. He dove into nature’s vast reserve, which surrounded him and the abandoned objects that he gathered. We run into his familiar themes, but the bird and the woman, serpents and stars have changed worlds and have submitted to ceramic’s materiality as well as to the rules of its game. The union of line and real space, of colour and substance, recaptures the primitive resonance of his savage paintings. Here, it is the flames of the kiln, after a slow alchemical process, that perform the integration of mind into matter’ (J. Dupin, ‘Terres de Grand Feu,’ in Joan Miró - Josep Llorens Artigas: Ceramics Catalogue raisonné, 1941-1981, ed. J. Punyet Miró & J. Gardy Artigas, Paris, 2007, p. 22).

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