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Joan Miró (1893-1983)
Joan Miró (1893-1983)

Personnages et oiseau dans la nuit

Details
Joan Miró (1893-1983)
Personnages et oiseau dans la nuit
signed 'Miró' (lower right); signed again, titled and dated 'Joan Miró Personnages et oiseau dans la nuit Barcelone, 26-11-1942' (on the reverse)
pencil on paper
18¾ x 25 1/8 in. (47.7 x 63.8 cm.)
Drawn in Barcelona, 26 November 1942
Provenance
Galerie Maeght Lelong, New York.
B.C. Holland, Inc., Chicago.
Jan Krugier Gallery, New York.
Richard Gray Gallery, Chicago (acquired from the above, 1988).
Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1989.
Exhibited
Newport Harbor Art Museum, California; New York, The Whitney Museum of Art (Equitable Center), and Minneapolis, The Walker Art Center, The Interpretative Link: Abstract Surrealism into Abstract Expressionism, Works on Paper 1938-1948, July 1986-April 1987, p. 194, no. 75.
Sale Room Notice
A photo-certificate from Jacques Dupin dated Paris, 28 March 2001 accompanies this drawing.

Lot Essay

A photo-certificate from Jacques Dupin dated Paris, 28 March 2001 accompanies this drawing.

In September 1941 Miró completed his celebrated series of Constellations, twenty-three gouaches in all, which resolve and transcend the antagonism and violence which characterize many of the works he painted during the previous decade. The anxiety and fear he had felt during the Spanish Civil War and at the onset of World War II gave way to a greater sense of joy, and signify the triumph of art over worldly cares and human strife.

The present work, and other from late 1941-1942, are "characterized by a freedom of invention and a marvelous effortlessness... In this new evolution of his art, which was to end in the creation of his definitive style, renewed contact with Spain after five years of absence --with Mallorca most especially-- was doubtless crucial" (J. Dupin, Miró, New York, 1962, p. 369). Here Miró moves away from the density of visual incident that characterizes the Constellations; nevertheless, he continues to draw on the essential elements of his personal mythology. There are a gargantuan female archetype which personifies the earth, a smaller male sorcere with arms raised to the stars in the heavens, and perched on the femaile is a bird, a divine messenger and symbol of inspiration and creativity.
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