John Duncan Fergusson (1874-1961)
Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's… Read more PROPERTY FORMERLY IN THE ESTATE OF CAPTAIN JOHN ERNEST CRAWFORD FLITCH
John Duncan Fergusson (1874-1961)

Fleurs

Details
John Duncan Fergusson (1874-1961)
Fleurs
oil on board laid on panel
20 x 17¾ in. (50.8 x 45.1 cm.)
Painted circa 1908.
Provenance
Captain John Ernest Crawford Flitch, and by descent. 
Exhibited
Cologne, City Exhibition Hall, International Art Exhibition: The Special Association of West German Friends and Artists, May - September 1912, catalogue not traced.
Special notice

Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.

Brought to you by

Alice Murray
Alice Murray

Lot Essay

In 1907, with his interest in the advancement of contemporary art in Paris and frustration with conservative Scotland, an inheritance following his father’s death in 1906 allowed Fergusson to move to Paris permanently.

Fergusson readily explored the new influences and creative dynamism of the French Capital, mixing with some of the greatest French avant-garde artists of the day such as Henri Matisse and André Derain. In common with these artists, Fergusson sought to develop the properties of colour, volume and line, and to do so through the subject matter of modern day Parisian life. He was particularly impacted by the bright use of colour and free unrefined brush strokes of the Fauves who were well established as the leaders of the Parisian avant-garde by the time of Fergusson’s arrival. Maintaining his own stylistic preferences, Fergusson tended to use a more muted palette with a focus on thick, fluid oil paint as opposed to the sparse application and areas of exposed canvas enjoyed by the Fauves.
Fleurs wonderfully epitomises the dramatic effect the European influences had on Fergusson’s work: a lighter palette, flattening of form and a heavy use of outlining in his dark red and blue aesthetic, a stark contrast to his earlier works.

'Well, I was in Paris, without money or rich relations ... but repeatedly encouraged by what someone has called "le bon air de Paris ...". Life was as it should be and I was very happy' (J.D. Fergusson, quoted in J. Geddes and M. Morris, Cafe Drawings in Edwardian Paris from the Sketch-Books of J.D. Fergusson, Glasgow, 1974, p. 8).

More from Modern | British & Irish Art

View All
View All