John Duncan Fergusson (1874-1961)
No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VA… Read more
John Duncan Fergusson (1874-1961)

Two portraits of Margaret Morris

Details
John Duncan Fergusson (1874-1961)
Two portraits of Margaret Morris
charcoal
7¾ x 57/8 in. (19.7 x 14.9 cm.) and smaller
Executed in 1916 (2)
Provenance
Presented to the present owners by Margaret Morris, the artist's wife.
Special notice

No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 17.5% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis.
Notice to Buyers Resident in Scotland Payment and collections may be made immediately following the end of the sale until 7.00pm. Collections may be made on Friday, 27 October 2000 from 9.00 am until 1.00 pm, after which all lots purchased by Scottish residents will be transported free of charge to either our Glasgow office, tel 44(0)141 332 8134 or to our Edinburgh office, tel 44(0)131 225 4756 where they will be available from 9.00 am on Monday, 30 October. Notice to Buyers outside Scotland Purchases made by buyers with addresses outside Scotland will be transferred to Christie's, 8 King Street, London SW1, for collection from noon on Monday, 30 October 2000. Purchases are only insured for a period of seven working days following the sale.

Lot Essay

Born in 1891 of Welsh/Irish parents, Margaret Morris was only a few weeks old when the family moved to France. A child prodigy, she danced at society concerts and in court drawing rooms where she was spotted by Sarah Bernhardt who offered to train her in Paris. Morris resented the formality of classical ballet training and from the age of twelve began to develop her own system of exercises based on the Greek Positions copied from Ancient artifacts.

In 1910 she founded the Margaret Morris Movement School, and soon established bases in London, Paris, Edinburgh and Glasgow. It was during a company visit to Paris in 1913 that she met her future husband the artist John Duncan Fergusson. In 1939, following the outbreak of war, they returned to Glasgow where they established the New Art Club and The Celtic Ballet. Many of her schools were however forced to close.

After the death of Fergusson in 1961, Morris moved back to London and set about revitalising the Margaret Morris Movement, which by 1984 had over half a million attendances at classes and strong international groups. She died in Glasgow in 1980 at the age of 89. Not only a professional dancer, Morris was also a painter and writer, publishing several works including a biography of her husband, The Art of J.D. Fergusson, Glasgow, 1974 and her autobiography, My Life in Movement, London, 1969.
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