Longines. A Very Fine and Rare 18k Gold, Enamel, Emerald and Diamond-set Keyless Lever Scarab-form Pendant Watch with Matching Chain
Longines. A Very Fine and Rare 18k Gold, Enamel, Emerald and Diamond-set Keyless Lever Scarab-form Pendant Watch with Matching Chain

SIGNED LONGINES, NO. 3075929, MANUFACTURED IN 1916

Details
Longines. A Very Fine and Rare 18k Gold, Enamel, Emerald and Diamond-set Keyless Lever Scarab-form Pendant Watch with Matching Chain
Signed Longines, No. 3075929, Manufactured in 1916
Oval nickel-finished jewelled lever movement, bimetallic compensation balance, silvered matte dial, Roman numerals, scarab-form case, realistically modelled hinged underside, translucent two colour orange enamel and diamond-set wings, opening to reveal the dial by depressing a button in the winding crown at the rear of the body, translucent two colour orange enamel and diamond-set head, emerald-set eyes, curved gold antennas, similarly decorated platinum chain, case numbered, dial and movement signed
58 mm. overall length
Provenance
Property from the Maurice and Muriel Fulton Collection

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Lot Essay

Accompanied by a Longines Extract from the Archives confirming that the present scarab-form pendant watch with silver dial and caliber 7.46 movement was invoiced on 10 July 1916 to Krammer, at the time the firm’s agent in Egypt.

Scarab-form watches made by Longines are exceedingly rare. The appeal of the present, highly attractive example is further enhanced by its very good overall condition and the presence of the matching chain.

Beetle or scarab-form watches were very fashionable in China in the 19th and early 20th centuries. A scarab-watch signed Vacheron Constantin is illustrated in The Chinese Watch by Alfred Chapuis, chapter "Jewelled Watches", p. 233, pl. 218. Two scarab-watches are described and illustrated in Timepieces, The Forbidden City Publishing House, pp. 282 & 283. The tome comprises a selection of timepieces in Beijing's Palace Museum which owns one of the largest collections of mechanical timepieces of the 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries in the world, comprising over 1,000 pieces. The collection contains both Chinese and foreign-made watches, clocks and automatons. Chinese exhibits came from the Palace's own workshops, Guangzhou (Canton) and Suzhou (Suchow). Watches made abroad include manufacturers from Britain, France, Switzerland, the United States and Japan.

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