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LUCIA, N.Y. CHEUNG (Chinese, B. 1950)
LUCIA, N.Y. CHEUNG (Chinese, B. 1950)

Mega Universe - The Universe of Many Universe

Details
LUCIA, N.Y. CHEUNG (Chinese, B. 1950)
Mega Universe - The Universe of Many Universe
signed and dated in Chinese (lower right)
gold leaf, ink and varnish on paper
130.5 x 49 cm. (51 3/8 x 19 1/4 in.)
Painted in 2015
three seals of the artist
Provenance
Private Collection, Asia

Brought to you by

Eric Chang
Eric Chang

Lot Essay

Lucia Cheung studied language, literature and art in Italy in the 1970s and had received rigorous training in Chinese ink painting from the Lingnan master Yang Shanshen since 1979, which resulted in her proficiency in Western and Chinese art techniques. Her works displayed in several solo exhibitions were later collected by museums and connoisseurs. Her large-scale mosaic Home with a View located in the MTR Central Station has become an important part of public institution collection. The work In Search of Landscape: Lofty Mountains and Running Rivers (Lot 269) not only investigates the changes in modern urbanites' experience of landscapes, but also reflects the relation between the nature and humanity. The fading landscape in the center was painted with solvent-borne light oil, which is why it seems translucent. At the upper-left part lies the ceiling image of The Great Hall of the People in Beijing. The artist appropriated it as the soft moonlight commonly seen in traditional Chinese ink paintings, that is, the artificial "crescent moon and starlit sky." Such a seemingly harmonious but in fact quite contradictory and oppressive combination faithfully reflects the true colors of the contemporary society.
Mega Universe - The Universe of Many Universe (Lot 270) not only laments the decline of natural landscapes, but also innovatively imitates Zhang Daqian's Blue and Green long scroll Cloudy Hua Shan , invoking a metaphor of ancientry to represent the present. It would be mere imitation had Cheung simply applied ink to this work. As a result, the artist deliberately substituted ink for solvent-borne light oil to create a radiograph-like effect. Finally, she rendered ink on the light oil, presenting the image in which the black and white parts contrast starkly with each other. Such a technique exhibits an overwhelming sense of roughness, solemnity and tension. This work reflects a process of reconstruction after destruction and representation after contemplation.

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