MARION, Frances (c.1732-1795), "The Swamp Fox," Partisan leader, Revolutionary War.  Autograph letter signed ("Frans Marion," with flourish), to an unidentified correspondent (probably Maj. Gen. Nathaniel Greene), Ferguson Swamp, 17 May 1781. 1 full page, 4to, neatly inlaid to a larger sheet, docketed on verso. Boldly signed.
Tax exempt.
MARION, Frances (c.1732-1795), "The Swamp Fox," Partisan leader, Revolutionary War. Autograph letter signed ("Frans Marion," with flourish), to an unidentified correspondent (probably Maj. Gen. Nathaniel Greene), Ferguson Swamp, 17 May 1781. 1 full page, 4to, neatly inlaid to a larger sheet, docketed on verso. Boldly signed.

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MARION, Frances (c.1732-1795), "The Swamp Fox," Partisan leader, Revolutionary War. Autograph letter signed ("Frans Marion," with flourish), to an unidentified correspondent (probably Maj. Gen. Nathaniel Greene), Ferguson Swamp, 17 May 1781. 1 full page, 4to, neatly inlaid to a larger sheet, docketed on verso. Boldly signed.

MARION PURSUES THE BRITISH FORCE WHICH ATTACKED HIS BASE AT SNOW ISLAND, IN THE CAMPAIGN TO DRIVE THE BRITISH FROM SOUTH CAROLINA

A rare war-date letter, written from the field, probably to Nathaniel Greene, his commander, during an important phase of Greene's campaign to expel the British army from Georgia and South Carolina. Marion and Light Horse Harry Lee had joined to attack the British garrison at Fort Watson, which surrendered on 23 April, then Fort Motte, which surrendered on 8 May. The two forces then separated. Here, Marion reports on the movements of a large British force commanded by Lord Rawdon (1754-1826), Cornwallis's most effective and aggressive junior officer. Rawdon had been left in charge of the widely scattered British posts in Georgia and South Carolina, After defeating Greene at Hobkirk's Hill in late April (see lot 7) he was forced to order the abandonment of many of the most remote British outposts, retaining his strongpoint at Camden. Not long before this letter, Marion's camp at Snow Island on the Pee Dee River had been sacked by a British party commanded by Col. Welbore Doyle.

Marion writes: "I sought you yesterday; just after I saw the rear of Rawdon pass the swamp & sent after them until they got within four miles of the Corner. Col. Doyle...took a different rout[e], but our horses was so tired we could not proceed after them. They have sent three boats down Santee [River] with their [illegible] and some baggage, but they have too much start to over take them. I shall take post in St. Stephens, near Munceys ferry to collect the men & refresh my horses - at present I have so few men that I cannot pretend to do any thing but hope my last Effort may increase them [may bring more volunteers to his command] in a few days."

Special notice

Tax exempt.
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