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Mark of John Samuel Hunt, London, 1865
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Mark of John Samuel Hunt, London, 1865

The Royal Hunt Cup, Ascot 1865

Details
Mark of John Samuel Hunt, London, 1865
The Royal Hunt Cup, Ascot 1865
Vase form, on spreading circular foot chased and applied with acanthus and foliage, the body with scrolling flowers and foliage on a matted ground, between two oval cartouches chased with hunting scenes of Chevy Chase and Herne the Hunter, with pierced scrolling foliate handle, on an octagonal black wooden plinth applied with two silver plaques and twice with the Royal cypher of Queen Victoria, marked on body, the base stamped Hunt & Roskell, Late Storr & Mortimer, No. 2839
162oz. (5,056gr.)
25¼ in. (64.3 cm.) high
The inscriptions on the plaques read, 'Ascot, 1865 and 'Won by Gratitude'.
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VAT rate of 5% is payable on hammer price plus buyer's premium

Lot Essay

The Royal Hunt Cup

The Times describes the Royal Hunt Cup run on Wednesday, June 14, 1865 as 'a piece of plate value 200 sovs. added to a sweepstake of 10 sovs. each, for all ages (2-yr-olds excepted). Winners extra.' The prize, in the form of a parcel-gilt Etruscan ewer, features hunting and the total value of the race was £990 including the trophy.

Mr. W. Robinson's Gratitude, by Newminster, a 5-year-old ridden by H. Covey, was started at 6 to 1 carrying 7st 8lb in a field of 25 starters. In a lively account The Times describes how the race commenced with 'the lot streaming over the hill in such close company as to render it next to impossible to speak positively as to which had the advantage.' Gratitude was part of a group close on the heels of the race leader Vabalathus, who however dropped away at the first hill, overtaken by Baron Rothschild's Camball, closely followed by Gratitude and several others at the enclosure, when most of the others fell away. The Times account concludes, 'At the stand Gratitude drew up, and heading the Baron's filly within a dozen strides of the chair, won very cleverly by half a length.'
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