MR. (B. 1969)
MR. (B. 1969)
MR. (B. 1969)
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MR. (B. 1969)
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This lot has been imported from outside of the UK … Read more
MR. (B. 1969)

New Tokyo Ferry Terminal (Ariake 4-chrome)

Details
MR. (B. 1969)
New Tokyo Ferry Terminal (Ariake 4-chrome)
fibre-reinforced plastic
39 3⁄8 x 57 7⁄8 x 69 5⁄8in. (100 x 147 x 177cm.)
Executed in 2004-2005, this work is from an edition of five unique variants plus two artist's proofs
Provenance
Lehmann Maupin, New York.
Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2007.
Exhibited
New York, Lehmann Maupin, Mr., 2007 (another from the edition exhibited).
Special notice

This lot has been imported from outside of the UK for sale and placed under the Temporary Admission regime. Import VAT is payable at 5% on the hammer price. VAT at 20% will be added to the buyer’s premium but will not be shown separately on our invoice.
Sale room notice
Please note this work is from an edition of five unique variants plus two artist's proofs and not as printed in the catalogue.

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Lot Essay

Before establishing his own practice, the artist known as Mr. worked as Takashi Murakami’s protégée for almost two decades. Like his teacher, Mr. too makes art in the so-called Superflat mode, a visual vernacular made popular by Murakami which fuses traditional Japanese aesthetics with the flat screen of digital imagery, all viewed in relation to the physical and very real topographical flattening of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. Like his mentor, Mr. looks to the Japanese idea of otaku, or cuteness, drawing from manga, anime, and video games to create his sugary yet uncanny figures. In New Tokyo Ferry Terminal (Ariake 4-chrome) (2004-2005), the world, its sunsets and night skies, seems to be contained in the girl’s wide-eyed expression. Purple hair, ice cream-coloured hair tie, and rainbow blush announce her whimsy, yet there is something eerie in her unblinking expression.

Mr.’s art is provocative and incendiary, representing the ‘point where innocence and experience collide, the transition from egoless childhood to adult self-awareness’ (A. Maerkle, ‘Mr.: Out Of Body Experience’, Art Asia Pacific, 1 May 2007). Manifesting a fictionalised life as reality has continual appeal for the artist, and he even lists the invented town of Cupa as his birthplace; in real life, he grew up near Kobe. Mr. graduated from the Sokei Art School in Tokyo, and his recent solo presentations include exhibitions at the Seattle Art Museum, and Musée d’Art Contemporain de Lyon, and the Musée Guimet in Paris, among others.
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