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Nicolas Cammillieri of Malta (c.1798-c.1856)
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Nicolas Cammillieri of Malta (c.1798-c.1856)

H.M.S. Warspite engaging two Egyptian corvettes at Navarino

Details
Nicolas Cammillieri of Malta (c.1798-c.1856)
H.M.S. Warspite engaging two Egyptian corvettes at Navarino
signed 'Cammillieri' (lower right) and with inscription 'H.M. Ship, Warspite Wm Parker Esq.r. C.B. Captain/off Navarin [sic] June 7th 1828 -' (lower centre)
pencil, pen and black ink and watercolour heightened with white, on paper
17½ x 22½ in. (44.5 x 57.2 cm.)

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Lot Essay

H.M.S. Warspite was a Third Rate of 76-guns built at Chatham and launched in 1807. After an active career, including service in the Anglo-American 'War of 1812' when she took three U.S. privateers. in 1826-27, she circumnavigated the world under the command of Captain William Parker before returning to the Malta squadron in 1828. She was detached to transport Count Capo d'Istria, President of the Greek republic, to various locations around the Eastern Mediterranean whilst blockading Navarino, Modon and Coron with the French and Russian allied squadrons. At Navarino she encountered two Egyptian corvettes, and finding her warning shots ignored, she rapidly engaged one of the vessels inflicting substantial damage, as represented above. The work offered here was almost certainly commissioned by Captain Parker to commemorate his part in the action.

Captain Parker had participated in several conferences with Ibrahim Pasha to negotiate the withdrawal of Turkish troops from Greece, and as a result H.M.S. Warspite was not present at the Battle of Navarino on 20th October 1827.

She was cut down to a 50-gun frigate in 1840 and remained at sea until 1862 when she was loaned to the Marine Society as a boys' training ship. Accidentally burned by fire at Woolwich in 1876, her wreck was subsequently broken up on the Thames.
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