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NICOLO BAROVIER (1895-1947)
THE COLLECTION OF FRANCESCO AND CHIARA CARRARO, VENICE
NICOLO BAROVIER (1895-1947)

A MURRINE VASE, CIRCA 1924

Details
NICOLO BAROVIER (1895-1947)
A MURRINE VASE, CIRCA 1924
executed by Vetreria Artistica Barovier, hand-blown murrine glass
11 ¾ in. (30 cm.) high
signed N Barovier, Murano
Literature
M. Barovier, A. Dorigato, D. Klein, L’Arte dei Barovier Vetrai Di Murano 1866-1972, Venice, 1993, p. 90 for a comparable work;
F. Deboni, Murano 900, Milan, 1996, p. 102 for a comparable work;
M. Barovier, Venetian Art Glass 1840-1970: An American Collection, Stuttgart, 2004, pp. 90-91 for comparable vases by the artist, executed using the same technique.
Post lot text
Nicolò Barovier, born in Murano in 1895 to an extended family with a long tradition in the field of glassmaking, distinguished himself as a masterful designer of art glass notable for its exceptional beauty and technical virtuosity. He and his older brother Ercole joined the family glasshouse, owned by their father, Benvenuto, and uncle, Giuseppe, in 1919 and the furnace's name was changed from Artisti Barovier to Vetreria Artistica Barovier. Both elders were maestros, revered especially for their creations in the ancient technique of murrina, or mosaic glass. This intricate process involves glass canes of various colors being arranged in a pre-conceived pattern, then heated, fused, elongated into rods and cut into thin discs that are laid down, one next to the other, to form a decorative motif. Nicolò
greatly expanded on the work of his father and uncle and designed extraordinary murrine vessels with an extremely modern sensibility. Executed in brilliant colors and depicting plant and flower forms in an exceedingly expressionistic manner, these vases were produced in very limited numbers and are considered masterpieces. The classic proportions of the present vase, combined with its abstracted imagery of jewel-toned grape clusters amidst emerald-green leaves, reveal the fertile mind of the designer and the supreme skills of Barovier's glassworkers.

Lot Essay

Similar examples can also be found in the Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, New York and the permanent collection of the Fondazione Carraro, Ca' Pesaro, Venice.

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