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Niele Toroni (b. 1937)
Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's… Read more
Niele Toroni (b. 1937)

Empreintes de pinceau no 50 répétées à intervalles régulieres (30cm)

Details
Niele Toroni (b. 1937)
Empreintes de pinceau no 50 répétées à intervalles régulieres (30cm)
stamped with date 'JUIN 1976' (on the reverse)
acrylic on oilcloth
200 x 138 cm.
Executed in 1976
Provenance
MTL Gilbert Goos, Brussels.
Special Notice

Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.

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Lot Essay

'These are fingerprints although here it is the paintbrush that leaves its shape. What interests me is that I don't invent a form, it's not a square, it's not a circle. Each stain is different.'

(Niele Toroni, interview for Color Chart: Footage of Niele Toroni painting interventions, New York, Museum of Modern Art, http:/www.moma.org/explore/multimedia/videos/10/256, accessed 3 March 2014)

'Simple, dry, laconic that is how the painting of Niele Toroni might look (maybe). Imprents of a brush no. 50 repeated at regular intervals (30 cm.). Is not this work an insult to our taste and intelligence? Then, however, consider the condition in which the contemporary painter finds himself; and consider what the history is and what the present practice in art confronting him. Our knowledge and perception of the world have changed. The world no longer is an Allegory Divine. The world now is physical and visual fact. The perception of the world in painting has changed. Painting has changed (is changing). Painting now is the bringing of other physical and visual facts into the world. The immediate model of the world being lost, painting has developed into a number of directions. Toroni has chosen to utilize one very distinct pictoral sign, the imprint of a brush no. 50 which is repeated regularly. The sign articulates painting as an act: to press with ones hand the brush on a material (canvas, paper, a wall), withdraw it and leave a trace of paint. This primary act remains the same throughout Toronis pictorial discourse. This act of painting traverses the spaces in which Toroni works is brought into that space as Toroni's act of painting, is brought into the world as the physical and visual document of his painting. It manifests painting as an individual act. Simple, dry, laconic? Or rather a passionate and moving attempt to continue the art of painting within the conditions of a contemporary culture?
(Rudi Fuchs quoted in Niele Toroni, exh.cat., Stedelijk Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, 1977)

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