[PRESIDENTS]. CLEVELAND, GROVER. Autograph letter signed in full as President, to Charles Eliot of Harvard University, Washington, D.C., 29 June 1894, 3 pages, 8vo: "May I write you in strictest confidence? I have now thrust upon me the selection of a Superintendant of the Coast and Geodetic Survey. I would like very much to select a man whom the Scientific people of the Country would recognize as related to them, and yet I must have great administrative ability...I know it is not easy to find it joined to Scientific attainment. Can you make a suggestion that will aid me?... -- TAFT, WILLIAM HOWARD. Two typed letters signed ("Wm. H. Taft") to Clarence Kelsey, New Haven, Conn. and Quebec, Canada, 6 June 1916 and 4 August 1918, each 2 1/4 pages, 4to, one with several autograph additions, both with fine political or legal content: "...My information from Chicago...is that everything looks favorable there to the nomination of Hughes and the defeat of Roosevelt. This is a result devoutly to be wished. However, I shall not feel easy until the whole thing is over....Poor England has suffered a very conspicuous loss in the sinking of the ship on which Kitchener was with his staff, but that is the fortune of war, and I presume Generals should consider themselves as subject to destruction in war as the manin the trenches. Kitchener was a great General....The regret felt for him will spread gloom in England..." [another:] "...I am glad to get your judgement about [Hugo L.?] Black. I never heard of him before...[regarding a judge Nazareth:] We have been able to agree on twenty-nine different cases, and I have been able to steer him off one of the wildest propositions that I have ever heard from anybody in reference to the living wage....With Russia in the condition it is, and with Germany with the force she still has, I don't see how we can do what has to be done in a year....It is necessary to get a new draft law...It is what we need...." -- ROOSEVELT, FRANKLIN DELANO. Typed letter signed ("Franklin D. Roosevelt") as Governor of New York, to W.H. Shaw, Albany, N.Y., 13 February 1831, one page, 4to, on Governor's stationery, declining Shaw's invitation to "join the Utica Chapter of the isaac Walton League of America," since "I have had to stop joining any organizations as there are many requests made of me...." -- HOOVER, HERBERT. Typed letter signed in full to Lawrence Requa, New York N.Y., 7 April 1941, one page, 4to, two file holes at top, evidently to a minerologist or mining engineering friend: "...I think you are right about the low grade ore. From the looks of things this war is going to last quite a while. As Spain and Portugal look as if they may be invaded next and overrun and in that case there will be no source of quicksilver....In this light, the Government would probably like to have such deposits worked...but I do not think it would be worth while to take it on at $150 per flask...." (5)

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[PRESIDENTS]. CLEVELAND, GROVER. Autograph letter signed in full as President, to Charles Eliot of Harvard University, Washington, D.C., 29 June 1894, 3 pages, 8vo: "May I write you in strictest confidence? I have now thrust upon me the selection of a Superintendant of the Coast and Geodetic Survey. I would like very much to select a man whom the Scientific people of the Country would recognize as related to them, and yet I must have great administrative ability...I know it is not easy to find it joined to Scientific attainment. Can you make a suggestion that will aid me?... -- TAFT, WILLIAM HOWARD. Two typed letters signed ("Wm. H. Taft") to Clarence Kelsey, New Haven, Conn. and Quebec, Canada, 6 June 1916 and 4 August 1918, each 2 1/4 pages, 4to, one with several autograph additions, both with fine political or legal content: "...My information from Chicago...is that everything looks favorable there to the nomination of Hughes and the defeat of Roosevelt. This is a result devoutly to be wished. However, I shall not feel easy until the whole thing is over....Poor England has suffered a very conspicuous loss in the sinking of the ship on which Kitchener was with his staff, but that is the fortune of war, and I presume Generals should consider themselves as subject to destruction in war as the manin the trenches. Kitchener was a great General....The regret felt for him will spread gloom in England..." [another:] "...I am glad to get your judgement about [Hugo L.?] Black. I never heard of him before...[regarding a judge Nazareth:] We have been able to agree on twenty-nine different cases, and I have been able to steer him off one of the wildest propositions that I have ever heard from anybody in reference to the living wage....With Russia in the condition it is, and with Germany with the force she still has, I don't see how we can do what has to be done in a year....It is necessary to get a new draft law...It is what we need...." -- ROOSEVELT, FRANKLIN DELANO. Typed letter signed ("Franklin D. Roosevelt") as Governor of New York, to W.H. Shaw, Albany, N.Y., 13 February 1831, one page, 4to, on Governor's stationery, declining Shaw's invitation to "join the Utica Chapter of the isaac Walton League of America," since "I have had to stop joining any organizations as there are many requests made of me...." -- HOOVER, HERBERT. Typed letter signed in full to Lawrence Requa, New York N.Y., 7 April 1941, one page, 4to, two file holes at top, evidently to a minerologist or mining engineering friend: "...I think you are right about the low grade ore. From the looks of things this war is going to last quite a while. As Spain and Portugal look as if they may be invaded next and overrun and in that case there will be no source of quicksilver....In this light, the Government would probably like to have such deposits worked...but I do not think it would be worth while to take it on at $150 per flask...." (5)

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