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REAGAN, Ronald. Autograph draft letter signed ("Ron") as Governor of California, to SENATOR BARRY GOLDWATER, [California, 1968]. 1 page, 4to (11 x 8½ in.), tiny staple holes in upper left corner, otherwise in fine condition.
REAGAN, Ronald. Autograph draft letter signed ("Ron") as Governor of California, to SENATOR BARRY GOLDWATER, [California, 1968]. 1 page, 4to (11 x 8½ in.), tiny staple holes in upper left corner, otherwise in fine condition.

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REAGAN, Ronald. Autograph draft letter signed ("Ron") as Governor of California, to SENATOR BARRY GOLDWATER, [California, 1968]. 1 page, 4to (11 x 8½ in.), tiny staple holes in upper left corner, otherwise in fine condition.

GOVERNOR REAGAN COMPLAINS ABOUT THE LIMITS OF STATE POWER

An important political letter, written to his political mentor, in which Reagan discusses Goldwater's suggestions for regaining state's rights from the Federal government: "If I could make a suggestion; it seems to me there is a risk in approaching this from the angle of 'we can't reverse the trend so let's join it.' You are completely right about the legislation and court decisions that have whittled away at state sovereignty, but why even admit this and put ourselves in the position of saying we were against this trend but now have to go along? Let's just say there is a legitimate area of cooperation between the Fed. & State Govt's. and the states could play a more meaningful role...The people would be better served and at probably less cost and the growing threat of Fed. Domination would be lessened...we must be prepared to present real specifics instead of just howling that we want states rights. We should pick some situations and explain the nuts and bolts of how the states would do the job. I'm learning in this job how much of our costly bungling is saddled on us by Fed. Rules we're powerless to change"

Reagan had been friendly with Goldwater since the early 1950s. When Goldwater won the Republican presidential nomination in 1964, Reagan eagerly agreed to help. One week before the election, at Goldwater's request, Reagan appeared on national television and gave a memorable speech "A Time for Choosing," in which he presented the conservative views on major issues he had been promoting in California for years. "You and I have a rendezvous with destiny", he grandiloquently concluded, in a phrase associated with his boyhood idol, Franklin Roosevelt. The speech created a political sensation and, almost overnight, Reagan became a national political figure.
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