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ROOSEVELT, Franklin D. Autograph endorsement signed ("FDR"), as President, n.d., beneath on autograph note signed ("G.C.M.") from General George C. Marshall to Harry Hopkins, Roosevelt's aide, n.d. 1 page, 12mo, on War Department stationery. [With:] Typed news bulletin, Paris, 4 October. 1 page, oblong.

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ROOSEVELT, Franklin D. Autograph endorsement signed ("FDR"), as President, n.d., beneath on autograph note signed ("G.C.M.") from General George C. Marshall to Harry Hopkins, Roosevelt's aide, n.d. 1 page, 12mo, on War Department stationery. [With:] Typed news bulletin, Paris, 4 October. 1 page, oblong.

ROOSEVELT "CHANGES JOBS" WITH CHIEF OF STAFF GEORGE C. MARSHALL.

A wildly erroneous news bulletin out of Paris claimed that "General George C. Marshall, the U.S. Chief of Staff, has been dismissed. President Roosevelt has taken over his command. This occurred two days ago, but has not yet been commented upon in Washington." The unexplained two-day "silence" on this momentous event did not stir any niggling doubts about its veracity in the mind of the journalist who transmitted this whopper. But the normally staid George Marshall saw an immediate opportunity for comedy--and a light-hearted dig at a sometimes vexing rival for FDR's attentions: "Dear Harry," he writes, "Are you responsible for pulling this fast one on me? G.C.M." Hopkins shared this note with FDR who wrote on it: "Dear George: Only true in part. I am now Chief of Staff but you are President. FDR"

Hopkins seemed to be responsible for just about everything in Roosevelt's wartime Cabinet, including delivering personal messages from FDR to Churchill and to Stalin on matters ranging from the opening of a second front to the Lend-Lease shipments. He and Roosevelt were not always punctilious about letting other government colleagues know what they were up to. More than once key decisions were made without any consultation with either the State Department or War Department. Roosevelt's high-handed, free-wheeling methods were an occasional source of exasperation for Marshall, who distinguished himself among FDR's top advisors by not laughing along at the President's jokes and insisting that he be addressed as "General," and not by his Christian name. Marshall must have gotten at least a wry smile out of this Presidential jest, and been pleased by its unmistakable subtext of deep respect on FDR's part. (2)
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