Sarah Lucas (B. 1962)
Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's… Read more
Sarah Lucas (B. 1962)

Nahuiolin

Details
Sarah Lucas (B. 1962)
Nahuiolin
incised with the artist's signature, numbered and stamped with the foundry mark 'SARAH LUCAS a/p 2 Pangolin Editions' (on the underside)
polished bronze on artist's concrete plinth
sculpture: 18 ½ x 16 1/8 x 22in. (47 x 41 x 56cm.)
plinth: 44 ½ x 17 ½ x 17 ½in. (113 x 44.5 x 44.5cm.)
overall: 63 x 17 ½ x 22in. (160 x 44.5 x 56cm.)
Executed in 2015, this work is artist's proof number two from an edition of six plus two artist's proofs
Provenance
Donated by the Artist, Courtesy of Sadie Coles HQ, London.
Exhibited
Venice, Central Pavilion, LV Venice Biennale, The Encyclopedic Palace, 2013 (another from the edition exhibited).
London, Whitechapel Gallery, Sarah Lucas SITUATION Absolute Beach Man Rubble, 2013 (another from the edition exhibited, illustrated in colour, p. 75).
New York, Gladstone Gallery, Sarah Lucas: NUD NOB, 2014 (another from the edition exhibited).
Special notice

Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.
Post lot text
Please note that the work illustrated and exhibited is another edition of Sarah Lucas Nahuiolin which is not for sale. The work (the 2nd Artist Proof of the Nahuiolin Edition) is in production and is anticipated to be completed by the end of May 2015 and after completion will be made available to the buyer of the work.

STUDENT AT GOLDSMITHS: 1984-1987
Sale room notice
Please note that the work illustrated and exhibited is another edition of Sarah Lucas Nahuiolin which is not for sale. The work (the 2nd Artist Proof of the Nahuiolin Edition) is in production and is anticipated to be completed by the end of May 2015 and after completion will be made available to the buyer of the work.

Please note the cataloguing should be as follows and not as stated in the printed catalogue:

Executed in 2015, this work is artist’s proof number two from an edition of six plus two artist’s proofs

Brought to you by

Amanda Lo Iacono
Amanda Lo Iacono

Lot Essay

A sensual stream of light runs through the sinuous anthropomorphic forms of Nahuiolin, witnessing Sarah Lucas’ distinctive and provocative visual language. The twisted body, infused with sexual energy, is central to Lucas’ work and finds a delicate and seductive example in the lithe intertwining bodily volumes of Nahuiolin. Moving from the fleshy physicality of her nylon-tight sculptures, begun in 2009, Lucas explores the smoothly liquefied and elegantly reflecting surface of polished bronze. As the critic Alexandra Parigoris has stated: ‘The unashamedly sexual innuendos of the bronze forms retain the sense of the hand that fashioned them. They twist and turn with a gracefulness that the reflections underscore and undercut at the same time. … Lucas’ bronzes … playfully misbehave and are saucily evocative with a lightness of touch that is not new to Lucas but a mark of her understanding of materials’ ability to create imagery that knows no barriers’ (A. Parigoris, ‘Sarah Lucas in bronze’, in Sarah Lucas SITUATION Absolute Beach Man Rubble, exh. cat., Whitechapel Gallery, London, 2013, p. 72). Another example taken from the edition of Nahuiolin was situated centrally in the sculpture garden at the 2013 Venice Biennale’s Central Pavilion, together with six other works in bronze by the artist. This encounter between Lucas’ lavish uncanny forms and the Giardini’s institutional spaces was prophetic of the artist’s official consecration as one of most important figures in contemporary British art as representative of the United Kingdom at the upcoming 2015 Venice Biennale. An example from the Nahuiolin’s edition also featured in Lucas’ celebrated solo-show Sarah Lucas: SITUATION Absolute Beach Man Rubble at the Whitechapel Gallery in 2013.

With its abstracted biomorphic mingling of forms, Nahuiolin presents the same controversial and incisive take on the human body that characterised Lucas’ rise as a key member of the Young British Artists in the early 1990s, together with breakthrough figures such as Damien Hirst, Tracey Emin and Chris Ofili. Lucas’ recent turn to such a historically loaded material as bronze witnesses a will to rewrite a pre-existing legacy of masculine dominance in sculpture, referencing and subverting the visual language of a pantheon of iconic male figurative artists, from British Modern Masters such as Henry Moore, to preeminent figures such as Constantin Brancusi. Lucas’ challenge to preconception about gender and sexuality is mirrored in the title, referring to the Mexican painter and artist’s model Carmen Mondragón, a regular on the early 1920s Paris art scene. Once divorced from her husband, Mondragón relocated to Mexico City, where she became a star of its artistic circle. She modelled for artists such as Diego Rivera and Tina Modotti, her mesmerising beauty captured in nude photographs by Edward Weston. Nicknamed Nahui Olin by one of her lovers, an Aztec symbol of renewal literally meaning ‘four movements’ and used to describe earthquakes, the work’s cryptic title not only poetically illustrates Nahuiolin’s elegant flow of forms in the waves of the polished bronze, but also the sensual disruptive energy of a female figure Lucas admires and empathises with.

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