[SEVEN YEARS' WAR]. State Of The British And French Colonies In North America, With Respect to Number of People, Forces, Forts, Indians, Trade and other Advantages. In which are considered, I. The defenceless Condition of our Plantations, and to what Causes owing. II. Pernicious Tendency of the French Encroachments, and the fittest Methods of frustrating them. III. What it was occasioned their present Invasion, and the Claims on which they ground their Proceedings. With a Proper Expedient proposed for preventing future Disputes. In Two Letters to a Friend. London: Printed for A. Millar, 1755.

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[SEVEN YEARS' WAR]. State Of The British And French Colonies In North America, With Respect to Number of People, Forces, Forts, Indians, Trade and other Advantages. In which are considered, I. The defenceless Condition of our Plantations, and to what Causes owing. II. Pernicious Tendency of the French Encroachments, and the fittest Methods of frustrating them. III. What it was occasioned their present Invasion, and the Claims on which they ground their Proceedings. With a Proper Expedient proposed for preventing future Disputes. In Two Letters to a Friend. London: Printed for A. Millar, 1755.

8o (195 x 125 mm). Disbound.

FIRST EDITION. Howes notes that some copies have a map. "It was during the first year of the War that printed pieces of the kind we now designate as propaganda began to pour in almost daily upon Loveday's library table. One of the earliest of these to come to him in 1755 was the anonymous State of the British and French colonies in North America, printed in London early in the year. This dispassionate statement of the British case, in spite of its firmness, failed to please the extremists, for, as happens always in periods of this kind, it had become unfashionable to allow the enemy any rights whatever. The tract seems to have been published while John Huske, a New Englander then resident in London, was writing his notable book on the same subject, and to have added fuel to the fire of anger which that writer maintained against the French. '... This very Week,' wrote Huske, 'a pamphlet has been published, called the State of the British and French Colonies, &c. which accuses his Majesty's Colonies with committing Frauds, Abuses, Encroachments, Murders, and every species of Villainy, against the poor Indians of North-America, by which they have been alienated from, and induced to take up Arms with the French against, Us; and all the evils America labours under have been thus produced.' As one accustomed to weigh arguments and evidence, however, Loveday found himself better pleased with the calm analysis of the anonymous writer of the State of the Colonies than with Huske's more popular whooping-on of the dogs of war" (Wroth, American Bookshelf). Howes S-903; Lande 809; Dionne II, 507; Sabin 90601; Simmons 1755#54; Staton & Tremaine/TPL 241; Streeter II:1011; Waldon, p.379.
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