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STATUETTE DE LUOHAN EN STEATITE SCULPTEE
STATUETTE DE LUOHAN EN STEATITE SCULPTEE

CHINE, DYNASTIE QING, XVIIIEME SIECLE

Details
STATUETTE DE LUOHAN EN STEATITE SCULPTEE
CHINE, DYNASTIE QING, XVIIIEME SIECLE
The luohan is finely carved seated on a rockwork base, dressed in long robes with heavy folds, and the hem delicately incised with leafy lotus. He is holding a vajra in his left hand, and has a serene expression with neatly rendered hair and moustache. The back is incised with a two-character signature Yu Xuan.
2¾ in. (7 cm.) high, wood stand
Post Lot Text
A SOAPSTONE FIGURE OF A SEATED LUOHAN
CHINA, QING DYNASTY, 18TH CENTURY

Lot Essay

The Yu Xuan signature is generally attributed to the famous Fujian soapstone carver Yang Yuxuan or Yang Ji who was believed to have been active during the early Kangxi period. One of the most revered carvers of his time, he is also credited with popularizing the trend of incorporating natural irregularities in stone into carving designs.
Compare with another luohan signed by Yang Yu Xuan with similar pronounced facial features and treatment of facial hair illustrated by G. Tsang and H. Moss, Arts from the Scholar's Studio, Hong Kong, 1986, p. 87, no. 45; and another luohan signed Yu Xuan supporting a miniature pagoda above his raised knee in the Palace Museum, Beijing (unpublished). Compare also the soapstone figure bearing the same signature, sold in Christie's London, 9 November 2010, lot 96.

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