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Stephen J. Renard (b.1943)
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Stephen J. Renard (b.1943)

Astra, Britannia, Candida and Lulworth racing off Fishbourne, Isle of Wight

Details
Stephen J. Renard (b.1943)
Astra, Britannia, Candida and Lulworth racing off Fishbourne, Isle of Wight
signed 'Stephen J Renard' (lower right)
oil on canvas
30 x 50 in. (67.3 x 127 cm.)
Special notice

No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 17.5% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis

Lot Essay

Designed and built by Camper & Nicholson at Gosport in 1928, Astra was a beautiful Bermudian-rigged composite cutter of 91½ tons gross (83 net) and measured 115 feet in length with a 20 foot beam. Originally built for Sir A. Mortimer Singer, the naturalised British son of the inventor of the sewing machine, she was owned for most of the 1930s by Mr. Hugh Paul who enjoyed much success with her during the so-called 'golden years' before the death of King George V after the 1935 season.

Britannia, arguably the most famous racing cutter of them all, was extremely successful throughout her long life and even though she was re-rigged seven times in all, her hull shape was so efficient that she remained competitive almost to the end. Starting with 33 wins in 39 races during her maiden season, she enjoyed two brilliant but quite separate careers under first, the Prince of Wales (1893-97), and then his son, King George V, after 1921. The latter grew so attached to her that, under the terms of his will, she was scuttled after his death in 1936 following the removal of all her salvageable gear.

Candida, rated at '23 metres', was designed by Charles Nicholson and built by Camper & Nicholson at Gosport for Mr. H.A. Andreae, the wealthy merchant banker, in 1929. A magnificent Bermudian-rigged cutter of 95½ tons gross (174 Thames), she measured 117 feet in length overall with a 20½ foot beam and was completed principally as a response to a slight change in the International Rules in 1928. A highly successful boat, she too was a frequent sight at Cowes during that golden decade before the Second World War interrupted the sport for so long.

Lulworth was designed and built by White Bros. at Itchen in 1920 and registered at 123 tons gross (186 Thames). Originally called Terpsichore, she changed her name when acquired by Alexander Paton and it was under his ownership that she really excelled. All four boats depicted here were classic examples of the Bermudian rig which brought such excitement to international racing throughout the 1930s.
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