THE RED BLUE CHAIR
'' ! '' Lots Imported from outside the EU. The buy… Read more FROM THE COLLECTION OF HAN SCHRÖDER (1926-1998) (LOTS 666 - 682) Han Schröder was born on 16 July 1918 in Utrecht, The Netherlands. Her artistic and architectural education began early, when her mother commissioned the architect Gerrit Thomas Rietveld to design what is now known as the Rietveld-Schröder House, completed in 1924. For this house Rietveld employed the revolutionary concept of moveable walls to make the interior flexible, thereby redefining the limits of space. Growing up in this house fueled Han's interest in architecture, and was the beginning of her friendship to Rietveld and her devotion to his ideas. With the encouragement of her family, Han developed her artistic talent, and worked with Rietveld and Gerard van de Groenekan on carpentry and furniture making in her teenage years. In 1936 she entered the Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland, and graduated in 1940 with the degree of Diplom Architekt. She did not return to the Netherlands during World War II, but worked in Portugal (where she worked for the Red Cross and the Netherlands Embassy) and Great Britain. She returned to the Netherlands in 1946. From 1946 to 1949 she worked in the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam under Willem Sandberg. Beginning in 1949 Schröder worked first as a draftsman and then as a personal assistant to Rietveld. During these years she experimented with materials and concepts of interior design. She worked with Rietveld on housing projects, schools, exhibitions, and the Sonsbeek Sculpture Pavillion, among other projects. She opened her own office in 1954. At that time she was one of two registered woman architects among 3000 registered men in The Netherlands. The most significant designs she did between 1954 and 1963 were the Gaastra House in Zeist; Ellinchem a humanist children's home in Ellecom; a villa in Zeist and various Youth and Community Centres in Utrecht, Oldenbroek and Eerbeek. During this time she also designed stationery and exhibits. In 1963 she emigrated to the United States. She first worked at firms in Los Angeles, California, but accepted a position at Adelphi University in Garden City, New York, to teach interior design. In 1966 she taught at the Parsons School of Design in New York City, and then at the New York Institute of Technology from 1967 to 1979. In 1979 she became a Professor of Interior Design at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia. She retired in 1988, and died in Amsterdam on March 20, 1992. (http://spec.lib.vt.edu)
THE RED BLUE CHAIR

DESIGNED BY G. TH. RIETVELD IN 1918, EXECUTED BY G.A. VAN DE GROENEKAN, CIRCA 1960/62

Details
THE RED BLUE CHAIR
DESIGNED BY G. TH. RIETVELD IN 1918, EXECUTED BY G.A. VAN DE GROENEKAN, CIRCA 1960/62
The underside of the seat lined with paper label inscribed G.A. v.d. Groenekan Utrechtseweg 315, DE BILT NEDERLAND
86 cm. high x 60 cm. wide x 83 cm. wide
Together with a photo of Han Schröder's interior in the USA showing the chair. (2)
Provenance
Han Schröder (1926-1998) and by descent to the present owner.
Special notice

'' ! '' Lots Imported from outside the EU. The buyer's premium is 48.75% incl. VAT over the first €20,000, plus 42.8% incl. VAT of the hammer price between €20,001 and €800.000, plus 33.28% incl. VAT of any amount in excess of 800.000.

Brought to you by

Nicole Verkade-Schraven
Nicole Verkade-Schraven

Check the condition report or get in touch for additional information about this

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay

Han Schröder wrote about this chair:
"The red and blue chair by G.Th. Rietveld 1917 was hand made by Gerard van de Groenekan for me in 1960/62 and shipped to the USA ca. 1965. A glue problem made it necessary to inject one connection with fresh glue through a newly drilled hole. It has been used since then, even as a private hideaway for our puppy. It needs to be noted that it is made adhering to the original dimensions. This is in contrast to the Castelli productions for which the dimensions have been changed somewhat and adapted to their materials and machines. For example the stanchions used are slightly heavier with Castelli, which is clearly visible and makes the chair look heavier."

cf. M. Küper, I. van Zijl, Gerrit Th. Rietveld 1888-1964. Het volledige werk, Utrecht (Centraal Museum) 1992, nr. 35, pp. 74-76, with ill.

More from The Decorative Arts Sale

View All
View All