Browse Lots

Global notice COVID-19 Important notice
THIRTY-SEVEN EGYPTIAN GLASS AMULETIC INLAYS
THIRTY-SEVEN EGYPTIAN GLASS AMULETIC INLAYS

LATE PERIOD, DYNASTY XXVII-XXX, 525-343 B.C.

Details
THIRTY-SEVEN EGYPTIAN GLASS AMULETIC INLAYS
LATE PERIOD, DYNASTY XXVII-XXX, 525-343 B.C.
Each mold-pressed, including a black Imsety; two turquoise standing figures of Nephthys; two red mummies; a pale blue Anubis holding a djed-pillar; a white Imsety; a turquoise lion-headed uraeus; two black reclining jackals, one facing right, one facing left; a golden yellow, a red, and a turquoise scarab; a turquoise uraeus on a nb-basket; a golden yellow and a red Ib-heart; two green squatting frogs, one facing right, one facing left; two turquoise squatting Thoth baboons, one facing right, one facing left; two white, one red and one golden yellow cow, each crowned with a solar disk and atef-plumes, representing either Hathor, Nut or Mehetweret; a pale blue mummiform Osiris with crook and flail, wearing a plumed atef-crown; two dark turquoise falcon-headed sphinxes, one facing right, one facing left, the facial markings and eyes once with supplementary inlays; two pale blue human-headed ba-birds; a golden yellow Nekhbet vulture on a basket; two turquoise praising baboons, one facing right, one facing left; a golden yellow tyt-amulet or girdle of Isis; one red djed-pillar with atef-crown; one red kneeling Nephthys; and a golden yellow and a pale blue winged falcon-headed scarab
Largest: 2 3/16 in. (5.6 cm.) long (37)
Provenance
Omar Pacha Sultan.
with Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva, 1976.
Literature
Collection de feu Omar Pacha Sultan Le Caire, Paris, 1929, no. 632.
G.D. Scott, III, Exhibition catalogue, Temple, Tomb and Dwelling: Egyptian Antiquities from the Harer Family Trust Collection, San Bernardino, 1992, no. 131, pp. 181 and 183.
R.H. Wilkinson, Symbols and Magic in Egyptian Art, New York, 1994, no. 74, pp. 116-117.
J. Hardin, Exhibition catalogue, The Lure of Egypt: Land of the Pharaohs Revisited, St. Petersburg, 1996, no. 91.
D.C. Forbes, "Harer Collection of Egyptian Antiquities on View at California's Newest Museum," in KMT, vol. 8, no. 1, Spring 1997, p. 27.
F.D. Friedman, ed., Exhibition catalogue, Gifts of the Nile: Ancient Egyptian Faience, New York, 1998, no. 156, pp. 241-246.
Exhibited
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, periodically 1986-1991.
San Bernardino, University Art Gallery, California State University and elsewhere, Temple, Tomb and Dwelling: Egyptian Antiquities from the Harer Family Trust Collection, 8 January-30 December 1992.
San Antonio Museum of Art, Mummies: The Egyptian Art of Death, 20 July 1993-1 October 1995.
St. Petersburg, Florida, Museum of Fine Arts, The Lure of Egypt: Land of the Pharaohs Revisited, 10 January-9 June 1996.
Providence, Rhode Island School of Design and elsewhere, Gifts of the Nile: Ancient Egyptian Faience, 10 May 1998-25 April 1999.

Lot Essay

These amulets have often been identified as faience. However, microscopic examination reveals that they are, in fact, glass. For related examples, correctly identified as glass, see nos. 335-438, pp. 157ff. in Goldstein, Pre-Roman and Early Roman Glass in the Corning Museum of Glass.

According to Thompson and Friedman (in Friedman, op. cit., p. 156), "these particular inlays were probably intended for a wooden coffin which would thus have been covered with multicolored, dazzling images of protective faience deities, many of whom would also have appeared wrapped in the mummy bandages."
;

More from ANCIENT EGYPTIAN ART FROM THE HARER FAMILY TRUST COLLECTION

View All
View All