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TRUMAN, Harry (1884-1972), President. Autograph letter signed ("Harry Truman") as President, TO FORMER SECRETARY OF LABOR FRANCES PERKINS, Washington, 3 January 1950. 1 full page, 4to (8¾ x 6 7/8 in.), imprinted pale green White House stationery, with matching envelope. [With:] TRUMAN. Photograph of the President and wife Bess inscribed and signed ("Best of luck to Douglas Campbell from Bess & Harry Truman"), n.p., 9 December 1959. 5 x 7 inches, mounted. Together two items.
This lot is exempt from Sales Tax.
TRUMAN, Harry (1884-1972), President. Autograph letter signed ("Harry Truman") as President, TO FORMER SECRETARY OF LABOR FRANCES PERKINS, Washington, 3 January 1950. 1 full page, 4to (8¾ x 6 7/8 in.), imprinted pale green White House stationery, with matching envelope. [With:] TRUMAN. Photograph of the President and wife Bess inscribed and signed ("Best of luck to Douglas Campbell from Bess & Harry Truman"), n.p., 9 December 1959. 5 x 7 inches, mounted. Together two items.

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TRUMAN, Harry (1884-1972), President. Autograph letter signed ("Harry Truman") as President, TO FORMER SECRETARY OF LABOR FRANCES PERKINS, Washington, 3 January 1950. 1 full page, 4to (8¾ x 6 7/8 in.), imprinted pale green White House stationery, with matching envelope. [With:] TRUMAN. Photograph of the President and wife Bess inscribed and signed ("Best of luck to Douglas Campbell from Bess & Harry Truman"), n.p., 9 December 1959. 5 x 7 inches, mounted. Together two items.

TRUMAN TO THE FIRST WOMAN CABINET MEMBER

A friendly letter, boldly penned, to the first woman to hold a cabinet appointment. Truman writes: "It was most kind and thoughtful of you to bring me that most interesting book, translated from the Spanish. The accompanying letter is one of the nicest I have ever received. I've been reading here and there in the Manual as you directed. There is wisdom in it, as in Solomon's Proverb's and Benj. Franklin's Poor Richard."

Perkins was appointed Secretary of Labor by Franklin Roosevelt in 1933 and was integral to the creation of important New Deal legislation relating to labor. Despite the importance of her position, she was a reluctant symbol of the women's movement: "She did not consider herself a feminist...but nevertheless she quietly supported women's causes in Washington" (Graham and Wander, Franklin D. Roosevelt: His Life and Times, p. 321). Perkins remained in the Cabinet for a short time after Truman assumed the presidency, but retired before the end of 1945. (2)
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