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WALTON, George (1741-1804), Signer (Georgia). Autograph letter signed ("GeoWalton"), also signed by Member of Congress Richard Howley, to an unidentified correspondent, Philadelphia, 13 August 1781. 2 pages, folio, neatly inlaid to a larger sheet.
WALTON, George (1741-1804), Signer (Georgia). Autograph letter signed ("GeoWalton"), also signed by Member of Congress Richard Howley, to an unidentified correspondent, Philadelphia, 13 August 1781. 2 pages, folio, neatly inlaid to a larger sheet.

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WALTON, George (1741-1804), Signer (Georgia). Autograph letter signed ("GeoWalton"), also signed by Member of Congress Richard Howley, to an unidentified correspondent, Philadelphia, 13 August 1781. 2 pages, folio, neatly inlaid to a larger sheet.

GEORGIA'S DELEGATES SEND A PRINTING PRESS, "A NEW...& EFFICACIOUS WEAPON AGAINST THE ENEMY..."

A fine letter of Walton, who at age 26 had been the youngest of the 56 Signers of the Declaration of Independence. Later, he served briefly as Governor, was captured and exchanged, and worked energetically to rally the backwoods residents to the American cause. As they report in this letter, much of Georgia had been retaken from the British in the last six months: "We had the honor of your very interesting dispatch...and we cannot fail to acknowledge the great and judicious efforts which you have made to restore our Constituents to the possession of their Country. Under your protection, and receiving all possible countenance, we have the highest confidence that the Enemy will not be able again to drive them out."

"Our colleague, Colonel Few, set about from hence for the very purposes mentioned in your letter. We are, however, very thankful for your sentiments upon the subject.... Mr. Telfair is expected here every day, to join the Delegation which it is wished you would mention to any of the people of Georgia, as he was absent when the last advises went away. His coming may enable another Delegate to repair to the State. It is in contemplation to send Mr. Timothy on to you with a press, which would give you a new, & we think efficacious weapon against the Enemy. The people of the country might certainly be regulated in their opinion, and be brought at once to contemplate & pursue a common object; and tories might be painted out of countenance [in an unfavorable light]..." Walton's letters are very uncommon.

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