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Wim Delvoye (b. 1965)

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Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.
Wim Delvoye (b. 1965)

Tattooed Pig Skin (Stefanie)

Details
Wim Delvoye (b. 1965) Tattooed Pig Skin (Stefanie) tattooed pig skin 51 x 50½in. (129.5 x 128.3cm.) Executed circa 1995
Provenance
Private Collection, London.
Special Notice

No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 17.5% will be added to the buyer's premium, which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis.
This lot is subject to storage and collection charges. **For Furniture and Decorative Objects, storage charges commence 7 days from sale. Please contact department for further details.**
Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.
Sale Room Notice
Artist's resale right ("droit de suite") applies to this lot. Please see the Important Notice to Bidders posted in the salerooms and at Bidder Registration.

Lot Essay

The pig, and pigskin for that matter, has played a central role in Delvoye's ouevre over recent years. The earliest tattooed skins date from 1994, and were first exhibited at Galerie Tanit in Munich in 1995. Since then the artist has continued to tattoo live pigs as well as stuffed or stretched skins. Delvoye's use of the tattoo seems to represent a sense of belonging as well as of distinction; often referencing the Hell's Angels and other "bad boys." When Delvoye tattooed his pigs, he derived his imagery from the traditional iconography of Harley Davidson logos, lovers' names, bleeding hearts and similar low-brow motifs" (Y. Fonci, "Cloaca: receptacle of connotations, producer of ... well, meanings" in Wim Delvoye. Cloaca, Amsterdam 2000, p. 7-30).

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