Eh Joe would be the best. Jackie is very good & Billie would be pleased and about one hour's worth of jolly time would be had by all'); he will not intervene in Peter Hall's production of Godot at the National Theatre, but 'TV Godot. Definitely no', referring also to his play Tryst, to be renamed Ghost Trio for the BBC production, 32 of the letters (of varying length, 17 lines and less) written on correspondence cards, recto only, and 4 (brief replies) written at the foot of letters from his correspondent; together with a typewritten shooting script of Ghost Trio annotated in autograph, comprising dialogue, instructions for camera and music and a studio plan, 10 pages, 4to, re-numbering, cancellations and approximately 25 words in autograph, written in red biro. Ghost Trio resembles an idea for a sketch that first came to Beckett in 1968, involving a 'tryst' theme and the transition from distant shot to close-up. The play has 'the form of a complex set of variations on appearance and reality' (James Knowlson. The Life of Samuel Beckett, 1996). It was shot at Ealing studios in 1976 with Ronald Pickup as the solitary figure and the voice was that of Billie Whitelaw. In one letter he writes when 'fumbling towards a new TV play' that 'If found it will be for Billie and Ronald alone, in the same mood as G[host] T[rio], about the required length and ready in time'. (37) " /> BECKETT, Samuel (1906-1989). Thirty-six autograph letters signed ('Samuel Beckett' and 'Sam') to Warren Brown (his literary agent in London) and one to Mr. Odgers, <I>Paris, Ussy, Tangier (3), London (1) and Berlin (2), 27 March 1968 - 27 April 1977 (one n.d.)</I>, referring to agreements and copyrights for his works for stage and television, in one confirming his refusal for <I>Not I</I> to be performed in Cape Town, mentioning that he is working with Madeleine Renaud and Pierre Chabert in Paris, and 'Good news that Billie [Whitelaw] will be back at the Court', later expressing his willingness to leave decisions to her; assuming that there is no objection to 'my releasing new play (<I>That Time</I>) as is my wont simultaneously to London, New York and German translator, leaving "world first" to take care of itself. Return to Paris next week. Then Paris - Ussy shuttle indefinitely, may even try to write again'; also about the possible production of various works by BBC television ('<I>Eh Joe</I> would be the best. Jackie is very good & Billie would be pleased and about one hour's worth of jolly time would be had by all'); he will not intervene in Peter Hall's production of <I>Godot</I> at the National Theatre, but 'TV <I>Godot</I>. Definitely no', referring also to his play <I>Tryst</I>, to be renamed <I>Ghost Trio</I> for the BBC production, <I>32 of the letters (of varying length, 17 lines and less) written on correspondence cards, recto only, and 4 (brief replies) written at the foot of letters from his correspondent</I>; together with a typewritten shooting script of <I>Ghost Trio</I> annotated in autograph, comprising dialogue, instructions for camera and music and a studio plan, <I>10 pages, 4to</I>, re-numbering, cancellations and approximately 25 words in autograph, written in red biro. <I>Ghost Trio</I> resembles an idea for a sketch that first came to Beckett in 1968, involving a 'tryst' theme and the transition from distant shot to close-up. The play has 'the form of a complex set of variations on appearance and reality' (James Knowlson. <I>The Life of Samuel Beckett</I>, 1996). It was shot at Ealing studios in 1976 with Ronald Pickup as the solitary figure and the voice was that of Billie Whitelaw. In one letter he writes when 'fumbling towards a new TV play' that 'If found it will be for Billie and Ronald alone, in the same mood as <I>G[host] T[rio]</I>, about the required length and ready in time'. (37) | Christie's