1 page, 8vo (7 x 5 in.), browned, laminated. [With:] various original materials relating to Bell's hydrofoil experiments, including: Graph recording fuel to speed ratio acheived during tests; -- Typescript Secret and Confidential Report on the Graham Bell 'Hydrodrome' H.D. 4, 28 September 1921. 21 pp., folio; -- Carbon typescript of Bell's Report on Experiments with the HD-4 Equipped with Liberty Motors, 26 September 1919. 4 pp., 4to. -- Two typescript extracts from Bell's "Home Notes", 1 entitled A Hydroplane Submarine Chaser, [Beinn Bhreagh], 5 February and 4 April 1917. 9 pp., 4to. -- TLS to Bell from the Smithsonian Institution (16 July 1920) forwarding photocopies from the Revista Marittima. -- Photographic copy of Bell's blueprint plans for the surfaces of the hydrodrome. -- NUTTING, William W. The HD-4. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1921. Together 9 items. BELL'S EXPERIMENTS WITH THE HYDROFOIL, WITH A HAND-DRAWN CARTOON In 1906, Bell began to develop plans for a "heavier than water machine," the hydrofoil boat. The vehicle was equipped with blades which would glide upon the surface of the water much as the wings of an airplane provided lift in the air. Bell and Frederick W. "Casey" Baldwin began experiments in 1908 and by the summer of 1911, Baldwin had successfully designed a prototype hydrofoil boat denominated the HD-1. Although the boat met with some degree of success in test runs, it suffered structural failures, and three versions of the hydrofoil were created and successively discarded. The successes and failures of the early models led Baldwin and Bell to design their most successful hydrofoil, the HD-4, in 1915. The HD-4 performed extremely well and, in 1919, set a world marine speed record, acheiving a velocity of 70.86 mph. Despite their accomplishments, the end of World War I signaled a decline of interest in the vehicle and its potential military uses, and the project was abandoned. Here, during the last year that the two men worked on the hydrofoil, Bell draws a cartoon, which he gave to Baldwin, entitled "Ye great new invention of F.W.B." In the cartoon's first scene, Baldwin raises his finger to his head as he develops the idea of the hydrofoil. The second scene portrays Baldwin riding the speeding boat. In the third and fourth scenes, disaster strikes as Baldwin's hydrofoil goes "nose down" into the water, throwing the unsuspecting inventor, who is then portrayed floating with only his legs above the surface. Bell signs the cartoon with the initials of his famous anagram name, H.A. Largelamb. (9) " /> BELL, Alexander Graham. A quantity of manuscripts and other materials relating to his design and experimentation with the hdyrofoil, including: Autograph cartoon entitled "Ye great new invention of F.W.B." signed ("H.A.L." [Bell's anagram pseudonym H.A. Largelamb]), n.p. [Beinn Bhreagh], 19 November 1921. <I>1 page, 8vo (7 x 5 in.), browned, laminated</I>. [With:] various original materials relating to Bell's hydrofoil experiments, including: Graph recording fuel to speed ratio acheived during tests; -- Typescript <I>Secret and Confidential Report on the Graham Bell 'Hydrodrome' H.D. 4</I>, 28 September 1921. <I>21 pp., folio</I>; -- Carbon typescript of Bell's <I>Report on Experiments with the HD-4 Equipped with Liberty Motors</I>, 26 September 1919. <I>4 pp., 4to</I>. -- Two typescript extracts from Bell's "Home Notes", 1 entitled <I>A Hydroplane Submarine Chaser</I>, [Beinn Bhreagh], 5 February and 4 April 1917. <I>9 pp., 4to</I>. -- TLS to Bell from the Smithsonian Institution (16 July 1920) forwarding photocopies from the <I>Revista Marittima</I>. -- Photographic copy of Bell's blueprint plans for the surfaces of the hydrodrome. -- NUTTING, William W. <I>The HD-4</I>. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1921. <I>Together 9 items</I>. BELL'S EXPERIMENTS WITH THE HYDROFOIL, WITH A HAND-DRAWN CARTOON In 1906, Bell began to develop plans for a "heavier than water machine," the hydrofoil boat. The vehicle was equipped with blades which would glide upon the surface of the water much as the wings of an airplane provided lift in the air. Bell and Frederick W. "Casey" Baldwin began experiments in 1908 and by the summer of 1911, Baldwin had successfully designed a prototype hydrofoil boat denominated the HD-1. Although the boat met with some degree of success in test runs, it suffered structural failures, and three versions of the hydrofoil were created and successively discarded. The successes and failures of the early models led Baldwin and Bell to design their most successful hydrofoil, the HD-4, in 1915. The HD-4 performed extremely well and, in 1919, set a world marine speed record, acheiving a velocity of 70.86 mph. Despite their accomplishments, the end of World War I signaled a decline of interest in the vehicle and its potential military uses, and the project was abandoned. Here, during the last year that the two men worked on the hydrofoil, Bell draws a cartoon, which he gave to Baldwin, entitled "Ye great new invention of F.W.B." In the cartoon's first scene, Baldwin raises his finger to his head as he develops the idea of the hydrofoil. The second scene portrays Baldwin riding the speeding boat. In the third and fourth scenes, disaster strikes as Baldwin's hydrofoil goes "nose down" into the water, throwing the unsuspecting inventor, who is then portrayed floating with only his legs above the surface. Bell signs the cartoon with the initials of his famous anagram name, H.A. Largelamb. (9) | Christie's