Sir Francis Drake. An Exhibition, London: British Library 1980, pp. 108-110); Michael Mercator, the engraver of the famous Drake Silver Medal, has also been proposed, both of these engravers having resided in London at the time, although it is also feasible that the plates were engraved in Leiden. A smaller format version of this and the other plans (measuring approx. 205 x 300 mm.) including captions in Latin and French and numerical instead of alphabetical keys, is known and is believed to have been intended for publication with the Leiden 1588 editions of the Bigges-Crofte narrative (but no copies of these editions containing the maps are known). "There is no evidence for an earlier date of the larger engravings than 1589, when they are mentioned on the title pages of two English editions published that year. It is therefore entirely possible that the smaller engravings appeared before the larger ones; no priority can, however, be established at present" (Kraus). The Boazio view-plans, of which no more than 15 complete and partial sets are known, are "probably the most interesting and important published graphic work pertaining to Drake and his career" (Kraus). Each plan is the first known printed representation of that locality, the plan of St. Augustine being the first known engraving of any locality in the present-day United States. The animals decorating the plans -- in this case a monkey, fanciful whale or spouting fish, and large flying fish -- were copied from drawings by John White, governor of the first English settlement in America, who along with the other surviving settlers returned to England from Roanoke Island with Drake's expedition. "It was undoubtedly in the course of the return voyage that the author of this view-plan [of St. Augustine] was able to copy the figure of the Dorado fish [and of the other creatures decorating the plans] from John White's original drawings" (Kraus). Boazio presumably obtained these copies, or even White's original drawings, from a member of the expedition, along with sketches of the towns and descriptions or drawings of Drake's attacks. The coloring of this copy is very similar to that of the Pierre S. duPont III copy, part of the complete set of five engravings, sold at Christie's New York on 8 October 1991, differing only in details of coloring (e.g., of the cartouche borders, the spouting fish, and a few hills) but of a nearly identical palette. " /> [BOAZIO, BAPTISTA]. [View-plan of Santiago, Cape Verde Islands, showing Sir Francis Drake's attack on the Spanish fort on November 17, 1585:] Hoc opidum divi Jacobi eu nomine quo insula vocatur et comercium habet cum Guynea et adiunctis regionibus Affricae... [Second caption:] Insula Divi Jacobi est clarissima omnium quae sunt in ora Africae ex adverso Cap Virid... [Leiden or London?, 1588 or 1589]. <I>Hand-colored engraved map, single sheet, 417 x 560 mm. (16 7/16 x 22 1/16 in.), lower margin extended, slight loss to lower left border, other margins frayed with a few repairs, originally folded twice, some wear along folds, skilfully reinforced on verso, one or two small neatly repaired holes, a few small abraded spots, mainly along centerfold, more severe rubbing along right-hand border, slight soiling</I>. Bird's-eye view-plan showing the port of Santiago and surrounding areas with the Spanish infantry battalions deployed inland and the English fleet commencing their attack in the bay, embellished with a large flying fish, a spouting whale, and a monkey, letter designations corresponding to a letterpress key. Fully colored by a contemporary hand. Cf. STC 3171.6c; Burden 65 and 70; and H. P. Kraus, <I>Sir Francis Drake, <I>A Pictorial Biography</I> (Amsterdam 1970), pp. 121-127 and nos. 20 and 49a. THE FIRST PUBLISHED VIEW OR PLAN OF SANTIAGO IN THE CAPE VERDE ISLANDS. This rare engraving is one of a group of four city plans showing Drake's Caribbean and American raids during his West Indies voyage of 1585-86 and a map showing Drake's trans-Atlantic route, engraved by Baptista Boazio to illustrate Walter Bigges and Master Croftes, <I>A Summarie and true discourse of Sir Francis Drake's West Indian Voyage</I>, of which slightly abridged Latin and French translations were published in Leiden in 1588, preceding the English edition published in London in 1589. Boazio, an Italian artist living in London (fl. 1586-1606) who does not appear to have accompanied the voyage, is known for several manuscript maps made in the late 1590s. but he "is not known to have been an engraver and there is no evidence to support the theory that he engraved the maps of the West Indies. [He is credited with the Drake maps on the title-page of one of the two English editions of the Bigges-Crofte narrative published in 1589.] It has been suggested tentatively that the engraver was Jodocus Hondius" (<I>Sir Francis Drake. An Exhibition</I>, London: British Library 1980, pp. 108-110); Michael Mercator, the engraver of the famous Drake Silver Medal, has also been proposed, both of these engravers having resided in London at the time, although it is also feasible that the plates were engraved in Leiden. A smaller format version of this and the other plans (measuring approx. 205 x 300 mm.) including captions in Latin and French and numerical instead of alphabetical keys, is known and is believed to have been intended for publication with the Leiden 1588 editions of the Bigges-Crofte narrative (but no copies of these editions containing the maps are known). "There is no evidence for an earlier date of the larger engravings than 1589, when they are mentioned on the title pages of two English editions published that year. It is therefore entirely possible that the smaller engravings appeared <I>before</I> the larger ones; no priority can, however, be established at present" (Kraus). The Boazio view-plans, of which no more than 15 complete and partial sets are known, are "probably the most interesting and important published graphic work pertaining to Drake and his career" (Kraus). Each plan is the first known printed representation of that locality, the plan of St. Augustine being the first known engraving of any locality in the present-day United States. The animals decorating the plans -- in this case a monkey, fanciful whale or spouting fish, and large flying fish -- were copied from drawings by John White, governor of the first English settlement in America, who along with the other surviving settlers returned to England from Roanoke Island with Drake's expedition. "It was undoubtedly in the course of the return voyage that the author of this view-plan [of St. Augustine] was able to copy the figure of the Dorado fish [and of the other creatures decorating the plans] from John White's original drawings" (Kraus). Boazio presumably obtained these copies, or even White's original drawings, from a member of the expedition, along with sketches of the towns and descriptions or drawings of Drake's attacks. The coloring of this copy is very similar to that of the Pierre S. duPont III copy, part of the complete set of five engravings, sold at Christie's New York on 8 October 1991, differing only in details of coloring (e.g., of the cartouche borders, the spouting fish, and a few hills) but of a nearly identical palette. | Christie's