Karl's Legacy, essays in 2 vols.] before it came. I was therefore prepared for it with what might be called an additional intrinsic interest -- but without this, & apart from the egotistical interest which I must naturally feel in a book of which I too am a part, I feel myself interested more each time I open it..." 21 March 1876: "...as you feelingly put it, we have sustained an irreparable loss in our family [the death of his son Oliver in November 1874]...Your extract about The Dwale Bluth [his son's just published posthumous book] is interesting to me as anything on that subject cannot fail to be. The note in the Athenaeum was I believe occasioned by an irate letter...from a singular character in Wales. The Editor not wishing to insert it made a note of it without I fancy knowing much of the matter. Although not very important to the literary quality of the book, I though it a pity the truth should not appear...." See Fredeman 86.8 for a book about the Rev. Ebsworth, author, editor, and friend of the Pre-Raphaelites; Two autograph letters signed to [?the author Thomas] Purnell, [London], 9 August 1872 and n.d., together 5 pages, 12mo & 8vo, a fold repaired with scotch tape, remnants of mounting, with a brief ALS from Brown's wife Emma to Purnell, one page, 12mo. 9 August 1872: "...I may now tell you in strict confidence...that my son [Oliver] has written a short novel [published as Gabriel Denver in 1873], perhaps that would cover 300 pages of print...The few who have seen it, Knight & Philip Marston [the blind poet and close friend of Oliver's] among them, are good judges of literature & have spoken to me very highly of it. I should take it as a very great favour if you can spare time to drop in some evening & talk it over with us & perhaps listen to a bit of it." In the undated letter Brown writes about "a little delicate matter, asking Purnell not to mention "tomorrow eveg." to a certain friend, as there was a special reason for not asking him; Autograph letter signed to "Dear Mr. Hipkins," [London], 4 August 1878, 2 pages, 8vo, on black-edged stationery, remnant of mounting on integral blank page, thanking Hipkins for his sympathy on the sudden death of Cicely Marston [sister of Philip Marston]: "...Poor Cicely...died last Sunday suddenly of apoplexy while calling on Mrs. [Louise Chandler] Moulton the American poetess [who edited a 1893 work of Philip Marston's poems]. As my wife was at Gt. Yarmouth with her daughter Cathy...Dr. Marston & Philip were on the continent & we didn't know where to telegraph...but they were back for the funeral...which took place from this house...There was also an inquest here, but I was fortunately all alone, Mrs. [William Michael] Rossetti [Brown's daughter] being with her husband in Dorsetshire -- so there were the fewer to be shocked by the sad affair...." (6) " /> BROWN, FORD MADOX. Two autograph letters signed to the Rev. Joseph Woodfall Ebsworth, [London], 16 September 1868 and 21 March 1876, <I>together 8 pages, 8vo, remnants of mounting,</I> fine letters on literary matters. 16 September 1868: "...Our mutual friend Mr. W[illiam] B[ell] Scott had spoken to me of the work [apparently <I>Karl's Legacy</I>, essays in 2 vols.] before it came. I was therefore prepared for it with what might be called an additional intrinsic interest -- but without this, & apart from the egotistical interest which I must naturally feel in a book of <I>which I too am a part</I>, I feel myself interested more each time I open it..." 21 March 1876: "...as you feelingly put it, we have sustained an irreparable loss in our family [the death of his son Oliver in November 1874]...Your extract about <I>The Dwale Bluth</I> [his son's just published posthumous book] is interesting to me as anything on that subject cannot fail to be. The note in the <I>Athenaeum</I> was I believe occasioned by an irate letter...from a singular character in Wales. The Editor not wishing to insert it made a note of it without I fancy knowing much of the matter. Although not very important to the literary quality of the book, I though it a pity the truth should not appear...." See Fredeman 86.8 for a book about the Rev. Ebsworth, author, editor, and friend of the Pre-Raphaelites; Two autograph letters signed to [?the author Thomas] Purnell, [London], 9 August 1872 and n.d., <I>together 5 pages, 12mo & 8vo, a fold repaired with scotch tape, remnants of mounting</I>, with a brief ALS from Brown's wife Emma to Purnell, <I>one page, 12mo.</I> 9 August 1872: "...I may now tell you in strict confidence...that my son [Oliver] has written a short novel [published as <I>Gabriel Denver</I> in 1873], perhaps that would cover 300 pages of print...The few who have seen it, Knight & Philip Marston [the blind poet and close friend of Oliver's] among them, are good judges of literature & have spoken to me very highly of it. I should take it as a very great favour if you can spare time to drop in some evening & talk it over with us & perhaps listen to a bit of it." In the undated letter Brown writes about "a little delicate matter, asking Purnell not to mention "tomorrow eveg." to a certain friend, as there was a special reason for not asking him; Autograph letter signed to "Dear Mr. Hipkins," [London], 4 August 1878, <I>2 pages, 8vo, on black-edged stationery, remnant of mounting on integral blank page</I>, thanking Hipkins for his sympathy on the sudden death of Cicely Marston [sister of Philip Marston]: "...Poor Cicely...died last Sunday suddenly of apoplexy while calling on Mrs. [Louise Chandler] Moulton the American poetess [who edited a 1893 work of Philip Marston's poems]. As my wife was at Gt. Yarmouth with her daughter Cathy...Dr. Marston & Philip were on the continent & we didn't know where to telegraph...but they were back for the funeral...which took place from this house...There was also an inquest here, but I was fortunately all alone, Mrs. [William Michael] Rossetti [Brown's daughter] being with her husband in Dorsetshire -- so there were the fewer to be shocked by the sad affair...." (6) | Christie's