Scribner's Magazine in New York, Cliffords Inn, London, 18 October 1896, 4 pages, 8vo, on Butler's imprinted letterhead, with original stamped envlope addressed by him, discussing in detail and at length errors in his book on Italian art and the sculptor Tabachetti, Ex Voto: An Account of the Sacro Monte or New Jerusalem at Varallo-Sesia (1888): "Alas! There are many very serious errors in Ex Voto, which I fear I see no prospect of my being able to correct in a second edition. The work set local students at Casale on the warpath...You are right about the Salita al Calvanio chapel having been restored since I wrote...a comparison of the expressions on some of the faces now with the photos in my book will show that they have lost somewhat of their earlier vigour. This I take it was inevitable and the work on the whole has been most conscientiously done. The figures not looking quite right for the position in which they are is probably due to their being made piecemeal in the town down below and perhaps to a little change in the baking, but on the whole they go wonderfully well together..."; Autograph letter signed ("S. Butler") to "Dear Mrs. Kerr," Cliffords Inn, London, 20 March 1902, 3 pages, 8vo, on Butler's imprinted letterhead, written less than three months before his death: "...I have no literary work on hand, having been occupied since the end of September with burning, & arranging the correspondence of a lifetime, and generally tidying up a mass of half finished M.S.S. which will all go straight into the fire on my death unless I leave it ship shape -- I hope, however, in May to settle down for a month at Varallo & write on the spot where I can verify everything as I go on a monogram on the Flemish sculptor Tabachetti (Jean de Wespin) about whom much new matter has been discovered since I wrote Ex Voto...Zola -- I cannot read him. But there is hardly anyone whom I can read -- & I cannot be bothered with French...As for the age of Pericles -- surely it was the beginning of the end was it not? in spite of all its splendour. What did turn out comparable to the Iliad & Odyssey written many a long century earlier..." (2) " /> BUTLER, SAMUEL. Autograph letter signed ("S. Butler") to Corwin Knapp Linson (artist and close friend of Stephen Crane's) at <I>Scribner's Magazine</I> in New York, Cliffords Inn, London, 18 October 1896, <I>4 pages, 8vo, on Butler's imprinted letterhead, with original stamped envlope addressed by him</I>, discussing in detail and at length errors in his book on Italian art and the sculptor Tabachetti, <I>Ex Voto: An Account of the Sacro Monte or New Jerusalem at Varallo-Sesia</I> (1888): "Alas! There are many very serious errors in <I>Ex Voto</I>, which I fear I see no prospect of my being able to correct in a second edition. The work set local students at Casale on the warpath...You are right about the Salita al Calvanio chapel having been restored since I wrote...a comparison of the expressions on some of the faces now with the photos in my book will show that they have lost somewhat of their earlier vigour. This I take it was inevitable and the work on the whole has been most conscientiously done. The figures not looking quite right for the position in which they are is probably due to their being made piecemeal in the town down below and perhaps to a little change in the baking, but on the whole they go wonderfully well together..."; Autograph letter signed ("S. Butler") to "Dear Mrs. Kerr," Cliffords Inn, London, 20 March 1902, <I>3 pages, 8vo, on Butler's imprinted letterhead</I>, written less than three months before his death: "...I have no literary work on hand, having been occupied since the end of September with burning, & arranging the correspondence of a lifetime, and generally tidying up a mass of half finished M.S.S. which will all go straight into the fire on my death unless I leave it ship shape -- I hope, however, in May to settle down for a month at Varallo & write on the spot where I can verify everything as I go on a monogram on the Flemish sculptor Tabachetti (Jean de Wespin) about whom much new matter has been discovered since I wrote <I>Ex Voto</I>...Zola -- I cannot read him. But there is hardly anyone whom I can read -- & I cannot be bothered with French...As for the age of Pericles -- surely it was the beginning of the end was it not? in spite of all its splendour. What did turn out comparable to the Iliad & Odyssey written many a long century earlier..." (2) | Christie's