General, CSA]. A fascinating group of six letters written by 23-year-old Catherine [Kate] Corbin, resident of the Moss Neck plantation near Fredericksburg, in which she discusses important events of the war and the encampment of General Jackson at the plantation. On September 14, 1861, Kate informs Maggie that southern women, both black and white, are uniting for the cause, but the weather has taken a toll on the soldiers: "they are dying in Fredericksburg like sheep." On January 23, 1863, she writes of Jackson's encampment at the plantation: "Gen. Jackson has his headquarters in the yard. I had a sort of prejudice against him when I first came up here, but since I have become acquainted with the dear old fellow I am charmed with him. He is often spoken of as awkward and homely but I think his face one of the finest I ever saw." She describes Jackson's staff, including Lt. James Power Smith ("who I think is as near perfection") and the strong Confederate position: "you would think our postion impregnable." On 9 April, Kate writes of the recent scarlet fever episode which took the life of five-year-old Jane Corbin, a favorite of Jackson's while at Moss Neck. James Robertson writes in Stonewall Jackson: "The small child quickly captured Jackson's heart...[when he learned of Jane's death] He who had watched impassively the carnage of many battles now wept like a child" (pp 681, 689). Kate notes: "Sister [Roberta Corbin] though undecided at first about putting on black...has at last determined to do so." She mentions that Jackson's Headquarters is still in visiting distance and that she hopes Dr. McGuire, Jackson's personal physician, will visit. On 21 April, she again writes of Jane's mother: "She has been a great deal in company, and indeed has not secluded herself the least since Jane's death." On 25 May 1863, Kate, a correspondent of Colenel "Sandie" Pendleton of Jackson's staff, addresses the impact of the General's death at Chancellorsville: "Dr. McGuire & Maj P[endleton] indeed all the staff, have been informed by Genl. Lee that they will not be allowed to relinquish their places & that the appointment of Lt. Genl will not be made for some time and it is a matter requiring great deliberation." On September 2, Kate writes of a letter she received "from Major Pendleton telling me of his promotion to Lieut Colonel and calling on me to rejoice with him...I ain't to call him 'major' any more...I had just as well call him Mr at once, for Sandie I can never be reconciled to." " /> [CIVIL WAR JACKSON, Thomas "Stonewall" (1824-1863), <I>General, CSA</I>]. A fascinating group of six letters written by 23-year-old Catherine [Kate] Corbin, resident of the Moss Neck plantation near Fredericksburg, in which she discusses important events of the war and the encampment of General Jackson at the plantation. On September 14, 1861, Kate informs Maggie that southern women, both black and white, are uniting for the cause, but the weather has taken a toll on the soldiers: "they are dying in Fredericksburg like sheep." On January 23, 1863, she writes of Jackson's encampment at the plantation: "Gen. Jackson has his headquarters in the yard. I had a sort of prejudice against him when I first came up here, but since I have become acquainted with the dear old fellow I am charmed with him. He is often spoken of as awkward and homely but I think his face one of the finest I ever saw." She describes Jackson's staff, including Lt. James Power Smith ("who I think is as near perfection") and the strong Confederate position: "you would think our postion impregnable." On 9 April, Kate writes of the recent scarlet fever episode which took the life of five-year-old Jane Corbin, a favorite of Jackson's while at Moss Neck. James Robertson writes in <I>Stonewall Jackson</I>: "The small child quickly captured Jackson's heart...[when he learned of Jane's death] He who had watched impassively the carnage of many battles now wept like a child" (pp 681, 689). Kate notes: "Sister [Roberta Corbin] though undecided at first about putting on black...has at last determined to do so." She mentions that Jackson's Headquarters is still in visiting distance and that she hopes Dr. McGuire, Jackson's personal physician, will visit. On 21 April, she again writes of Jane's mother: "She has been a great deal in company, and indeed has not secluded herself the least since Jane's death." On 25 May 1863, Kate, a correspondent of Colenel "Sandie" Pendleton of Jackson's staff, addresses the impact of the General's death at Chancellorsville: "Dr. McGuire & Maj P[endleton] indeed all the staff, have been informed by Genl. Lee that they will not be allowed to relinquish their places & that the appointment of Lt. Genl will not be made for some time and it is a matter requiring great deliberation." On September 2, Kate writes of a letter she received "from Major Pendleton telling me of his promotion to Lieut Colonel and calling on me to rejoice with him...I ain't to call him 'major' any more...I had just as well call him Mr at once, for <I>Sandie</I> I can never be reconciled to." | Christie's