5 pages, 4to, integral address leaf, red wax seals, minor tears, tipped to another sheet. Lengthy letter on the history and lives of the citizens of his native New Hampshire. Less than ten years before, Webster first won national prominence by his Supreme Court defence of Dartmouth College against the state government of New Hampshire, in which he vindicated the surpremacy of the United States Constitution. "...[The people of New Hampshire] were a wonderful People...The determined spirit, with which they resisted every approach of what they thought evil, was itself a great virtue...The inquiry with them was not whether the thing was bearable, but whether it was right." Together 2 items. (2) " /> CLAY, HENRY. Autograph letter signed to Mrs. MacGregor, Ashland, 19 August 1848. <I>1 page, 4to, integral blank, tipped to a larger sheet</I>. Good letter on the failure of his last bid to secure the Whig nomination for President: "...I am very thankful for the expression of your friendly regrets on account of the failure of the Philad[elphia] Convention to nominate me for the Presidency. I am relieved from painful suspense and much anxiety, during the Canvass, and from immense responsibility, if I had been elected, as I believe that I should have been, if I had received the nomination. For myself, therefore, I ought not, on my own account, to be dissatisfied with what was done; but I do feel deeply the disappointment of my friends, who had put their warm hearts upon an event, which now can never happen." -- WEBSTER, DANIEL. Autograph letter signed to Dartmouth Prof. Charles B. Hadduck, Boston, 14 October 1826. <I>5 pages, 4to, integral address leaf, red wax seals, minor tears, tipped to another sheet</I>. Lengthy letter on the history and lives of the citizens of his native New Hampshire. Less than ten years before, Webster first won national prominence by his Supreme Court defence of Dartmouth College against the state government of New Hampshire, in which he vindicated the surpremacy of the United States Constitution. "...[The people of New Hampshire] were a wonderful People...The determined spirit, with which they resisted every approach of what they thought evil, was itself a great virtue...The inquiry with them was not whether the thing was bearable, but whether it was right." <I>Together 2 items</I>. (2) | Christie's